tocsin


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toc·sin

 (tŏk′sĭn)
n.
1.
a. An alarm sounded on a bell.
b. A bell used to sound an alarm.
2. A warning; an omen.

[French, alteration of toquassen, from Old French touque-sain, from Old Provençal tocasenh : tocar, to strike (from Vulgar Latin *toccāre) + senh, bell (from Late Latin signum, from Latin, signal; see sign).]

tocsin

(ˈtɒksɪn)
n
1. an alarm or warning signal, esp one sounded on a bell
2. an alarm bell
[C16: from French, from Old French toquassen, from Old Provençal tocasenh, from tocar to touch + senh bell, from Latin signum]

toc•sin

(ˈtɒk sɪn)

n.
1. a signal, esp. of alarm, sounded on a bell or bells.
2. a bell used to sound an alarm.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Occitan tocasenh literally, (it) strikes (the) bell =toca, 3d singular present of tocar to strike, touch + senh bell, sign]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tocsin - the sound of an alarm (usually a bell)tocsin - the sound of an alarm (usually a bell)
alarum, warning signal, alarm, alert - an automatic signal (usually a sound) warning of danger
2.tocsin - a bell used to sound an alarmtocsin - a bell used to sound an alarm  
bell - a hollow device made of metal that makes a ringing sound when struck

tocsin

noun
A signal that warns of imminent danger:
Translations
hälytyskello

tocsin

[ˈtɒksɪn] N
1. (= alarm) → campana f de alarma, rebato m
2. (fig) → voz f de alarma
to sound the tocsindar la voz de alarma, tocar a rebato

tocsin

n (old)Alarmglocke f, → Alarm m
References in classic literature ?
Monsieur Gabelle, chief functionary of the place, became uneasy; went out on his house-top alone, and looked in that direction too; glanced down from behind his chimneys at the darkening faces by the fountain below, and sent word to the sacristan who kept the keys of the church, that there might be need to ring the tocsin by-and-bye.
The tocsin rang impatiently, but other help (if that were any) there was none.
The illuminated village had seized hold of the tocsin, and, abolishing the lawful ringer, rang for joy.
The sound of drumming and trumpeting came from the Albany Street Barracks, and every church within earshot was hard at work killing sleep with a vehement disorderly tocsin.
I was just putting out my light when the telephone rang a furious tocsin in the next room.
63) Yet, just two years later, Tocsin was hailing the 'wider ocean of national citizenship'; Labor was 'the only REAL National Party in Australia'.
If Tocqueville's analysis of the tyranny of the majority seems like a proleptic warning about political correctness, his discussion of democratic despotism sounds a pertinent tocsin about the encroachments of the nanny state.
One Tocsin article by `Naturalist' was apparently written on 4 November 1597.
They're mushrooming," says Jerry Sloan, president of Project Tocsin, a Sacramento-based group that monitors the religious right, Sloan cites figures published in April in Focus on the Family's glossy magazine, which claim that Dobson's programs now reach over 660 million people in 95 countries.
It was left to Canadian pianist Oliver Jones to provide the sophisticated climax, sparring with drummer Daffy Tocsin.
In 1764, sounding the tocsin of alarm, a group of Yorkshire masters published a series of warnings against embezzlement in the local press.
Jerry Sloan of Project Tocsin, a group that monitors the Religious Right, notes that unified churches may be useful in swaying the votes of diverse constituencies during political campaigns.