tod


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tod

 (tŏd)
n. Chiefly British
1. A unit of weight for wool, especially one equivalent to about 28 pounds (12.7 kilograms).
2. A bushy clump, as of ivy.

[Middle English todde.]

tod

(tɒd)
n
(Units) Brit a unit of weight, used for wool, etc, usually equal to 28 pounds
[C15: probably related to Frisian todde rag, Old High German zotta tuft of hair]

tod

(tɒd)
n
on one's tod slang Brit on one's own
[C19: rhyming slang Tod Sloan/alone, after Tod Sloan, a jockey]

tod

(tɒd)
n
(Animals) a Scot and northern English dialect word for a fox
[C12: of unknown origin]

tod1

(tɒd)

n.
1. an English unit of weight, chiefly for wool, commonly equal to 28 pounds (12.7 kilograms).
2. a bushy mass, esp. of ivy.
[1375–1425; late Middle English todde; akin to Frisian todde small load, Old Norse toddi piece, slice]

tod2

(tɒd)

n. Scot.
a fox.
[1125–75; Middle English (north); of obscure orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tod - a unit of weight for wool equal to about 28 pounds
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
weight unit, weight - a unit used to measure weight; "he placed two weights in the scale pan"
Adj.1.tod - alone and on your own; "don't just sit there on your tod"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
unaccompanied - being without an escort
Translations

tod

[tɒd] N (Brit) on one's toda solas

tod

n (Brit inf) on one’s todganz allein
References in classic literature ?
Tod moved OUT; because sometimes Tommy Brock moved IN; (without asking leave).
Tod was at home in the stick-house he has gone to Mr.
Tod was coming up Bull Banks, and he was in the very worst of tempers.
Tod slapped his stick upon the earth and fumed; he guessed where Tommy Brock had gone to.
Tod kept creeping cautiously into the house, and retreating hurriedly out again.
Tod came back yet again into the bedroom with a clothes line.
Tod turned his back towards the bed, and undid the window.
Tod stood and looked at him for a minute; then he left the room again.
Tod had gone out at the front door, and round to the back of the house.
Tod fetched a large heavy pailful of water from the spring, and staggered with it through the kitchen into his bedroom.
Tod put down the pail beside the bed, took up the end of rope with the hook--hesitated, and looked at Tommy Brock.
Tod gingerly mounted a chair by the head of the bedstead.