toiler


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toil 1

 (toil)
intr.v. toiled, toil·ing, toils
1. To labor continuously; work strenuously.
2. To proceed with difficulty: "The old woman ... proceeded to toil up the narrow staircase before us" (James Joyce).
n.
1. Exhausting labor or effort. See Synonyms at work.
2. Archaic Strife; contention.

[Middle English toilen, from Anglo-Norman toiler, to stir about, from Latin tudiculāre, from tudicula, a machine for bruising olives, diminutive of tudes, hammer.]

toil′er n.

toil 2

 (toil)
n.
1. often toils Something that binds, snares, or entangles one; an entrapment: caught in the toils of despair.
2. Archaic A net for trapping game.

[French toile, cloth, from Old French teile, from Latin tēla, web; see teks- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toiler - one who works strenuouslytoiler - one who works strenuously    
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
Translations

toiler

nSchwerarbeiter(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
The rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work.
All his life he had been a toiler, and joy had been with him in the fierce combat which he had waged day by day.
Because I am a harvest-labourer, because I am a toiler and a moiler, because you are delivered over unto me and are become as a precious instrument in my hands.
Nothing for the spent toiler to do, but to compare the monotony of his seventh day with the monotony of his six days, think what a weary life he led, and make the best of it--or the worst, according to the probabilities.
As he said, in the preface to his second book, The Toiler, he endeavoured really to know the working people, and the only possible way to achieve this was to work beside them, eat their food, sleep in their beds, be amused with their amusements, think their thoughts, and feel their feeling.
With his shaven chin, round limbs, and heavy eyelids he did not look like a toiler, and even less like an adventurer of the sea.
The night wayfarers had passed away, the great army of toilers as yet slumbered.
Think of them, the toilers, the oppressed, God's children, groaning under the iniquitous laws of generations of evil statesmanship.
To paint such pictures, one must have the pen of the most illustrious of our poets, the author of The Toilers of the Deep.
The toilers of the sea ran in and beached their barque.
As Sheldon rode about the plantation, acknowledging to himself the comfort and convenience of a horse and wondering why he had not thought of getting one himself, he pondered the various improvements for which Joan was responsible--the splendid Poonga-Poonga recruits; the fruits and vegetables; the Martha herself, snatched from the sea for a song and earning money hand over fist despite old Kinross's slow and safe method of running her; and Berande, once more financially secure, approaching each day nearer the dividend-paying time, and growing each day as the black toilers cleared the bush, cut the cane-grass, and planted more cocoanut palms.
The pathos and tragedy of their experiences--aged and honest toilers subjected to pitiless task-masters or to the yoke of social injustice; lonely women uncomplainingly sacrificing their lives for unworthy men; sad-faced children, the victims of circumstances, of cold-blooded parents, or of the worst criminals--these things play a large part in almost all of Dickens' books.