toleration

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tol·er·a·tion

 (tŏl′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Tolerance with respect to the actions and beliefs of others.
2. Official recognition of the rights of individuals and groups to hold dissenting opinions, especially on religion.

toleration

(ˌtɒləˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the act or practice of tolerating
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) freedom to hold religious opinions that differ from the established or prescribed religion of a country
ˌtolerˈationism n
ˌtolerˈationist n

tol•er•a•tion

(ˌtɒl əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of tolerating, esp. of allowing, enduring, or accepting what is not actually approved; forbearance.
2. allowance by law or government of the exercise of religions other than an established one.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toleration - a disposition to tolerate or accept people or situationstoleration - a disposition to tolerate or accept people or situations; "all people should practice toleration and live together in peace"
permissiveness, tolerance - a disposition to allow freedom of choice and behavior
self acceptance - an acceptance of yourself as you are, warts and all
2.toleration - official recognition of the right of individuals to hold dissenting opinions (especially in religion)toleration - official recognition of the right of individuals to hold dissenting opinions (especially in religion)
permission, permit, license - the act of giving a formal (usually written) authorization
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"

toleration

noun
1. acceptance, endurance, indulgence, sanction, allowance, permissiveness, sufferance, condonation They urged toleration of mixed marriages.
2. religious freedom, freedom of conscience, freedom of worship his views on religious toleration, education and politics

toleration

noun
Translations
تَسامُح دينيتَسامُح، إحْتِمال
tolerancetolerování
overbærenhedtolerance
eltûréstûrés
umburîarlyndiumburîarlyndi, frjálslynd stefna
tolerovanie
strpnost
göz yummahoş görmehoşgörütolerans

toleration

[ˌtɒləˈreɪʃən] Ntolerancia f
religious tolerationtolerancia f religiosa

toleration

[ˌtɒləˈreɪʃən] ntolérance f

toleration

nDuldung f, → Tolerierung f

toleration

[ˌtɒləˈreɪʃn] ntolleranza

tolerate

(ˈtoləreit) verb
to bear or endure; to put up with. I couldn't tolerate his rudeness.
ˈtolerable adjective
1. able to be borne or endured. The heat was barely tolerable.
2. quite good. The food was tolerable.
ˈtolerance noun
1. the ability to be fair and understanding to people whose ways, opinions etc are different from one's own. We should always try to show tolerance to other people.
2. the ability to resist the effects of eg a drug. If you take a drug regularly, your body gradually acquires a tolerance of it.
ˈtolerant adjective
showing tolerance. He's very tolerant towards his neighbours.
ˈtolerantly adverb
ˌtoleˈration noun
1. the act of tolerating. His toleration of her behaviour amazed me.
2. tolerance, especially in religious matters. The government passed a law of religious toleration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jacqueline Rose's essay on adiaphora (matters indifferent to worship) and debates over authority sheds light on aspects related to tolerationism and religious coexistence that are often overlooked.
117) Thus Novikov's tolerationism arose both from his reading of Scripture and from the Rosicrucian Enlightenment.
11) While Milton's response to Ireland allegedly compromised his liberalism and radicalism, the early conception of tolerationism within the context of Protestant unity and supremacy explains how even nonconformist thinkers like Milton could countenance anti-Irish hostility.