toll


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Related to toll: take a toll, Toll roads

toll 1

 (tōl)
n.
1. A fixed charge or tax for a privilege, especially for passage across a bridge or along a road.
2. A charge for a service, such as a telephone call to another country.
3. An amount or extent of loss or destruction, as of life, health, or property: "Poverty and inadequate health care take their toll on the quality of a community's health" (Los Angeles Times).
tr.v. tolled, toll·ing, tolls
1. To exact as a toll.
2. To charge a fee for using (a structure, such as a bridge).

[Middle English tol, from Old English, variant of toln, from Medieval Latin tolōnīum, from Latin telōnēum, tollbooth, from Greek telōneion, from telōnēs, tax collector, from telos, tax; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

toll 2

 (tōl)
v. tolled, toll·ing, tolls
v.tr.
1. To sound (a large bell) slowly at regular intervals.
2. To announce or summon by tolling.
v.intr.
To sound in slowly repeated single tones.
n.
1. The act of tolling.
2. The sound of a bell being struck.

[Middle English tollen, to ring an alarm, perhaps from tollen, to entice, pull, variant of tillen, from Old English -tyllan.]

toll

(təʊl)
vb
1. to ring or cause to ring slowly and recurrently
2. (tr) to summon, warn, or announce by tolling
3. (Hunting) US and Canadian to decoy (game, esp ducks)
n
the act or sound of tolling
[C15: perhaps related to Old English -tyllan, as in fortyllan to attract]

toll

(təʊl; tɒl)
n
1.
a. an amount of money levied, esp for the use of certain roads, bridges, etc, to cover the cost of maintenance
b. (as modifier): toll road.
2. loss or damage incurred through an accident, disaster, etc: the war took its toll of the inhabitants.
3. (Historical Terms) Also called: tollage (formerly) the right to levy a toll
4. (Telecommunications) Also called: toll charge NZ a charge for a telephone call beyond a free-dialling area
[Old English toln; related to Old Frisian tolene, Old High German zol toll, from Late Latin telōnium customs house, from Greek telōnion, ultimately from telos tax]

toll1

(toʊl)

n.
1. a payment or fee exacted, as by the state, for some right or privilege, as for passage along a road or over a bridge.
2. the extent of loss, damage, suffering, etc., resulting from some action or calamity: The toll was 300 persons dead or missing.
3. a tax, duty, or tribute, as for services or use of facilities.
4. a payment made for a long-distance telephone call.
5. a compensation for services, as for transportation or transmission.
v.t.
6. to collect (something) as toll.
7. to impose a tax or toll on (a person).
v.i.
8. to collect toll; levy toll.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English (c. Old High German zol, Old Norse tollr), by-form of Old English toln < Late Latin tolōnēum, for telōnēum < Greek telōneîon tollhouse, ultimately derivative of télos tax]

toll2

(toʊl)

v.t.
1. to cause (a large bell) to sound with single strokes slowly and regularly repeated.
2. to sound or strike (a knell, the hour, etc.) by such strokes.
3. to announce by this means; ring a knell for (a dying or dead person).
4. to summon or dismiss by tolling.
5. Also, tole. to allure; entice.
v.i.
6. to sound with single strokes slowly and regularly repeated, as a bell.
n.
7. the act of tolling a bell.
8. one of the strokes made in tolling a bell.
9. the sound made.
[1175–1225; Middle English: to entice, lure, pull, hence probably to make (a bell) ring by pulling a rope]
toll′er, n.

toll

- Traces back to Greek telos, "tax."
See also related terms for tax.

Toll

 a clump of trees, 1644.

toll


Past participle: tolled
Gerund: tolling

Imperative
toll
toll
Present
I toll
you toll
he/she/it tolls
we toll
you toll
they toll
Preterite
I tolled
you tolled
he/she/it tolled
we tolled
you tolled
they tolled
Present Continuous
I am tolling
you are tolling
he/she/it is tolling
we are tolling
you are tolling
they are tolling
Present Perfect
I have tolled
you have tolled
he/she/it has tolled
we have tolled
you have tolled
they have tolled
Past Continuous
I was tolling
you were tolling
he/she/it was tolling
we were tolling
you were tolling
they were tolling
Past Perfect
I had tolled
you had tolled
he/she/it had tolled
we had tolled
you had tolled
they had tolled
Future
I will toll
you will toll
he/she/it will toll
we will toll
you will toll
they will toll
Future Perfect
I will have tolled
you will have tolled
he/she/it will have tolled
we will have tolled
you will have tolled
they will have tolled
Future Continuous
I will be tolling
you will be tolling
he/she/it will be tolling
we will be tolling
you will be tolling
they will be tolling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tolling
you have been tolling
he/she/it has been tolling
we have been tolling
you have been tolling
they have been tolling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tolling
you will have been tolling
he/she/it will have been tolling
we will have been tolling
you will have been tolling
they will have been tolling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tolling
you had been tolling
he/she/it had been tolling
we had been tolling
you had been tolling
they had been tolling
Conditional
I would toll
you would toll
he/she/it would toll
we would toll
you would toll
they would toll
Past Conditional
I would have tolled
you would have tolled
he/she/it would have tolled
we would have tolled
you would have tolled
they would have tolled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.toll - a fee levied for the use of roads or bridges (used for maintenance)toll - a fee levied for the use of roads or bridges (used for maintenance)
fee - a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional services
2.toll - value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain somethingtoll - value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something; "the cost in human life was enormous"; "the price of success is hard work"; "what price glory?"
value - the quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable; "the Shakespearean Shylock is of dubious value in the modern world"
death toll - the number of deaths resulting from some particular cause such as an accident or a battle or a natural disaster
3.toll - the sound of a bell being strucktoll - the sound of a bell being struck; "saved by the bell"; "she heard the distant toll of church bells"
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
knell - the sound of a bell rung slowly to announce a death or a funeral or the end of something
angelus, angelus bell - the sound of a bell rung in Roman Catholic churches to announce the time when the Angelus should be recited
Verb1.toll - ring slowlytoll - ring slowly; "For whom the bell tolls"
knell, ring - make (bells) ring, often for the purposes of musical edification; "Ring the bells"; "My uncle rings every Sunday at the local church"
2.toll - charge a fee for usingtoll - charge a fee for using; "Toll the bridges into New York City"
levy, impose - impose and collect; "levy a fine"

toll

1
verb
1. ring, sound, strike, chime, knell, clang, peal Church bells tolled and black flags fluttered.
2. announce, call, signal, warn of Big Ben tolled the midnight hour.
noun
1. ringing, ring, tolling, chime, knell, clang, peal the insistent toll of the bell in the church tower

toll

2
noun
1. charge, tax, fee, duty, rate, demand, payment, assessment, customs, tribute, levy, tariff, impost Opponents of motorway tolls say they would force cars onto smaller roads.
2. damage, cost, loss, roll, penalty, sum, number, roster, inroad There are fears that the death toll may be higher.
3. adverse effects, price, cost, suffering, damage, penalty, harm Winter takes its toll on your health.

toll 1

noun
1. A fixed amount of money charged for a privilege or service:
2. A loss sustained in the accomplishment of or as the result of something:

toll 2

verb
To give forth or cause to give forth a clear, resonant sound:
Translations
رَسْمرَسْم مُرورمِقْدار ضَرَر الكارِثَهيَدُق
mýtnémýtooběťvyzvánětztráty
omkostningringebetalings-bompenge
kellonlyöntimaksutulli
cestarina
fórn, missir, blóîtakahringja hægt og hátíîlegatollur, gjald, skattur
鐘の音
종치기
nodevanodokliszvanīt
mostnémýtostraty
avgift
ค่าผ่านทาง
ağır ağır çalmakçan sesigeçiş ücretihasar boyutusayısı
lệ phí cầu đường

toll

1 [təʊl]
A. N
1. (on road, bridge) → peaje m, cuota f (Mex)
to pay tollpagar el peaje
2. (= losses, casualties) → número m de víctimas, mortandad f
the death toll on the roadsel número de víctimas de accidentes de tráfico
there is a heavy tollhay muchas víctimas, son muchos los muertos
the disease takes a heavy toll each yearcada año la enfermedad se lleva a muchas víctimas or causa gran número de muertes
the effort took its toll on all of usel esfuerzo tuvo un grave efecto en todos nosotros
the severe weather has taken its toll on the cropsel mal tiempo ha ocasionado pérdidas en la cosecha
B. CPD toll bar Nbarrera f de peaje
toll booth Ncabina f de peaje
toll bridge Npuente m de peaje or (Mex) de cuota
toll call N (US) (Telec) → conferencia f
toll gate Nbarrera f de peaje
toll motorway N (Brit) → autopista f de peaje
toll road Ncarretera f de peaje

toll

2 [təʊl]
A. VT [+ bell] → tañer, tocar
to toll the hourdar la hora
B. VI [bell] → tañer, doblar
the bells were tolling in mourning fordoblaron las campanas en señal de duelo por ...
"for whom the bell tolls""por quién doblan las campanas"
C. N [of bell] → tañido m, doblar m

toll

[ˈtəʊl]
n
(= tax, charge) → péage m
(= number of dead or hurt) → bilan m
the accident toll on the roads → le bilan des accidents de la route
the death toll → le bilan des morts
the casualty toll → le bilan des victimes
the murder toll → le taux de meurtres
the second highest annual murder toll in that city's history → le deuxième plus fort taux de meurtres dans l'histoire de cette ville
to take its toll (= have bad effect) → avoir un impact négatif
to take its toll on sb/sth → peser sur qn/qch
vi [bell] → sonnertoll bridge npont m à péagetoll call n (US)appel m longue distancetoll charge npéage mtoll-free [ˌtəʊlˈfriː]
adj (US) [number, call] → gratuit(e)
adv [call] → gratuitementtoll road nroute f à péage

toll

:
tollbar
nZahlschranke f, → Mautschranke f
tollbooth
nZahlstelle f, → Mautstelle f
toll bridge
ngebührenpflichtige Brücke, Mautbrücke f
toll call
n (US) → Ferngespräch nt
toll-free (US Telec)
adj number, callgebührenfrei
adv callgebührenfrei
tollgate
nSchlagbaum m, → Mautschranke f
tollhouse
nMauthaus nt

toll

:
tollkeeper
nMautner(in) m(f) (esp Aus)
toll plaza
n (US: Mot) (→ Reihe fvon) → Mauthäuschen pl
toll road

toll

1
viläuten; for whom the bell tollswem die Stunde schlägt
vt bellläuten
nLäuten nt; (= single stroke)Glockenschlag m

toll

2
n
(= bridge toll, road toll)Maut f, → Zoll m, → Benutzungsgebühr f; (US Telec) → (Fernsprech)gebühr f; toll chargeMaut f, → Mautgebühr f
(= deaths, loss etc) the toll on the roadsdie Zahl der Verkehrsopfer; the toll of the floods continues to rise (in terms of people) → die Zahl der Opfer der Flutkatastrophe steigt ständig weiter; (in terms of property) → das Ausmaß der Flutschäden wird immer größer; the earthquake took a heavy toll of human lifedas Erdbeben forderte or kostete viele Menschenleben; the toll of the warder Blutzoll des Krieges

toll

1 [təʊl]
1. n
a. (on road) → pedaggio
b. (losses, casualties) the death toll on the roadsil numero di vittime sulle strade
the severe winter has taken its toll on the crops → l'inverno rigido ha colpito duramente il raccolto
2. adj (road, bridge) → a pedaggio

toll

2 [təʊl]
1. vt & vi (bell) → suonare lentamente e solennemente
2. n (of bell) → rintocco

toll1

(təul) verb
to ring (a bell) slowly. The church bell tolled solemnly.

toll2

(təul) noun
1. a tax charged for crossing a bridge, driving on certain roads etc. All cars pay a toll of $1; (also adjective) a toll bridge.
2. an amount of loss or damage suffered, eg as a result of disaster. Every year there is a heavy toll of human lives on the roads.
toll-free numberFreefone

toll

رَسْم mýtné omkostning Maut διόδια peaje kellonlyönti péage cestarina pedaggio 鐘の音 종치기 tolgeld bompenger opłata (za przejazd) pedágio колокольный звон avgift ค่าผ่านทาง çan sesi lệ phí cầu đường 通行费
References in classic literature ?
The claim on Hunker Creek took toll from its possessors.
When the Sunday-school hour was finished, the next morning, the bell began to toll, instead of ringing in the usual way.
When it was made, he took toll upon it; and his heirs still take toll, and the sons of the navvies who dug it and of the engineer who designed it pay the toll when they have occasion to travel by it, or to purchase goods which have been conveyed along it.
What knight-errant ever paid poll-tax, duty, queen's pin-money, king's dues, toll or ferry?
Since we had entered the territory we had not seen a hostile Indian, and we had, therefore, become careless in the extreme, and were wont to ridicule the stories we had heard of the great numbers of these vicious marauders that were supposed to haunt the trails, taking their toll in lives and torture of every white party which fell into their merciless clutches.
In former years they had marched rough shod over enormous areas, taking toll by brute force even when kindliness or diplomacy would have accomplished more; but now they were in bad straits--so bad that they had shown their true colors scarce twice in a year and then only when they came upon an isolated village, weak in numbers and poor in courage.
Well, that was settled; he had lost his portmanteau also; for the sixpence with which he had paid the Murrayfield Toll was one that had strayed alone into his waistcoat pocket, and unless he once more successfully achieved the adventure of the house of crime, his portmanteau lay in the cloakroom in eternal pawn, for lack of a penny fee.
These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things--taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here.
But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pig you have, that I may sacrifice him for this stranger, and we will take toll of him ourselves.
On my honor," replied the gentleman, "I believe the bell has the good taste to toll of its own accord.
The tolls are high, And every city levies its own toll, And prentices are unskilful, and wives even Lack sense and cunning, though Bianca here Has brought me a rich customer to-night.
The Canadians proved as patient of toll and hardship on the land as on the water; indeed, nothing could surpass the patience and good-humor of these men upon the march.