tooth decay


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den′tal car′ies


n.
decay in teeth caused by bacteria that form acids in the presence of sucrose, other sugars, and refined starches.

tooth decay

Plaque (film of sugar and bacteria) weakens the protective enamel of teeth. Bacterial action then attacks the tooth structure, leading to cavities and even tooth loss.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tooth decay - soft decayed area in a toothtooth decay - soft decayed area in a tooth; progressive decay can lead to the death of a tooth
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
KARACHI -- Developing countries such as Pakistan has a high burden of common dental diseases like tooth decay and periodontal disease.
KARACHI -- 'Developing countries such as Pakistan has a high burden of common dental diseases like tooth decay and periodontal disease.
Local to reflect it's in the of the health children More than quarter of Birmingham five-yearolds suffer from tooth decay.
ISLAMABAD -- Children who don't drink fluoridated tap water are more prone to cavities or tooth decay.
MORE than a quarter of Birmingham five-year-olds suffer from tooth decay, and the figure is higher in the city than in many other parts of the country.
THE number of children under the age of 10 needing hospital treatment because of tooth decay is twice as high as the number needing help for a broken arm, according to new analysis.
Did you know, tooth decay is the number one chronic infection disease affecting children in the US.
Summary: New Delhi [India], August 4 (ANI): Researchers are developing new means to prevent tooth decay.
TOOTH decay levels among fiveyear-old children are falling in Wales, a new report has revealed.
TOOTH decay levels among five-year-old children are falling in Wales, a new report has revealed.
The proportion of 5 year old children with poor dental health in Wales is continuing to fall, with children from the most deprived backgrounds seeing the biggest reduction in tooth decay over the last decade, a new report published today (Friday 7 July 2017) shows.
The findings suggest that tooth decay or dental caries can be stopped, reversed, and prevented without the need for the traditional 'fill and drill' approach that has dominated dental care for decades, Medical Xpress reported.