topography


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to topography: climate, Corneal topography

to·pog·ra·phy

 (tə-pŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. to·pog·ra·phies
1. Detailed, precise description of a place or region.
2. Graphic representation of the surface features of a place or region on a map, indicating their relative positions and elevations.
3. A description or an analysis of a structured entity, showing the relations among its components: In the topography of the economy, several depressed areas are revealed.
4.
a. The surface features of a place or region.
b. The surface features of an object: The topography of a crystal.
5. The surveying of the features of a place or region.
6. The study or description of an anatomical region or part.

top′o·graph′ (tŏp′ə-grăf′) n.
top′o·graph′ic (-grăf′ĭk), top′o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
top′o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

topography

(təˈpɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Physical Geography) the study or detailed description of the surface features of a region
2. (Physical Geography) the detailed mapping of the configuration of a region
3. (Physical Geography) the land forms or surface configuration of a region
4. (Surveying) the surveying of a region's surface features
5. the study or description of the configuration of any object
toˈpographer n
topographic, ˌtopoˈgraphical adj
ˌtopoˈgraphically adv

to•pog•ra•phy

(təˈpɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the detailed mapping or charting of the features of a relatively small area or district.
2. the detailed description, esp. by means of surveying, of particular localities, as cities, towns, or estates.
3. the relief features or surface configuration of an area.
4. the features, relations, or configuration of a structural entity, as the mind.
5. a schema of a structural entity reflecting a division into distinct areas having a specific relation to one another.
[1400–50; late Middle English topographye < Late Latin topographia < Greek topographía]
top•o•graph•ic (ˌtɒp əˈgræf ɪk) top`o•graph′i•cal, adj.
top`o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

to·pog·ra·phy

(tə-pŏg′rə-fē)
1. The shape, height, and depth of the land surface in a place or region. Physical features that make up the topography of an area include mountains, valleys, plains, and bodies of water. Man-made features such as roads, railroads, and landfills are also often considered part of a region's topography: the mountainous topography of Switzerland.
2. The detailed description or drawing of the physical features of a place or region, especially in the form of contour maps. See more at gradient.

topography

The configuration of the ground to include its relief and all features. Topography addresses both dry land and the sea floor (underwater topography).

topography

1. the detailed mapping or description of the features of a relatively small area, district, or locality.
2. the relief features or surface configuration of an area. — topographer, n. — topographic, adj.
See also: Maps
1. the art or technique of preparing charts or maps of a specified area.
2. the physical features of an area. — topographic, topographical, adj.
See also: Geography

topography

1. The study of the surface features of a region or the mapping of these.
2. The surface features of a particular place, or a description of these.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.topography - the configuration of a surface and the relations among its man-made and natural featurestopography - the configuration of a surface and the relations among its man-made and natural features
shape, configuration, conformation, contour, form - any spatial attributes (especially as defined by outline); "he could barely make out their shapes"
2.topography - precise detailed study of the surface features of a regiontopography - precise detailed study of the surface features of a region
geographics, geography - study of the earth's surface; includes people's responses to topography and climate and soil and vegetation
topology - topographic study of a given place (especially the history of the place as indicated by its topography); "Greenland's topology has been shaped by the glaciers of the ice age"

topography

noun
The character, natural features, and configuration of land:
Translations

topography

[təˈpɒgrəfɪ] Ntopografía f

topography

[təˈpɒgrəfi] ntopographie f

topography

nTopografie f

topography

[təˈpɒgrəfɪ] ntopografia
References in classic literature ?
Happily, their father, completely absorbed in a practical, scientific, and approving contemplation of the topography and material resources of the scene of his future labors, had no time to notice their defection.
Revolving all this in her mind, she cast her eyes around her, and arranged the topography of the garden in her head.
It is plain therefore that the audience for whom the "Odyssey" was written was one that would be unlikely to know anything about the topography of the Peloponnese, so that the writer might take what liberties she chose.
if we only had some one to instruct us about the physical and moral topography of this castle.
The leave of absence which you have asked for the purpose of enabling you to carry into execution your designs of exploring the country to the Rocky Mountains, and beyond with a view of assertaining the nature and character of the various tribes of Indians inhabiting those regions; the trade which might be profitably carried on with them, the quality of the soil, the productions, the minerals, the natural history, the climate, the Geography, and Topography, as well as Geology of the various parts of the Country within the limits of the Territories belonging to the United States, between our frontier, and the Pacific; has been duly considered, and submitted to the War Department, for approval, and has been sanctioned.
His forlorn travels of the preceding winter had made him acquainted with the topography of the country, and he reached Snake River without any material difficulty.
He had picked up from a table the book of antiquarian topography, in which Haddow had found his first hints about the origin of the local name, and, being a man with a quiet and quaint capacity for being interested in anything, he began to read it steadily, making notes now and then of details on which his previous reading left him with a certain doubt about his present conclusions.
I don't know whether you have given much study to the topography.
I did not get then, and I have not got since, a distinct conception of the journey through Hell, and as often as I have tried to understand the topography of the poem I have fatigued myself to no purpose, but I do not think the essential meaning was lost upon me.
For this new edition adds to the original merits of the work the very substantial charm of abundant illustrations, first-rate in subject and execution, and of three kinds--copper-plate likenesses of actors and other personages connected with theatrical history; a series of delicate, picturesque, highly detailed woodcuts of theatrical topography, chiefly the little old theatres; and, by way of tail-pieces to the chapters, a second series of woodcuts of a vigour and reality of information, within very limited compass, which make one think of Callot and the German [76] "little masters," depicting Garrick and other famous actors in their favourite scenes.
Entirely surrounding us is a great salt marsh, which protects us from invasion by land, while the rugged and ofttimes vertical topography of our mountain renders the landing of hostile airships a precarious undertaking.
Our friend Powell," he began again, "was very anxious that I should understand the topography of that cabin.