tornado

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tor·na·do

 (tôr-nā′dō)
n. pl. tor·na·does or tor·na·dos
1. A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the ground, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer, with destructive winds up to 510 kilometers (316 miles) per hour or higher. Tornadoes are typically associated with a funnel cloud pendant from a storm's wall cloud, often extending to the bottom of the tornado.
2. A violent thunderstorm in western Africa or nearby Atlantic waters.
3. A whirlwind or hurricane.

[Alteration (probably influenced by Spanish tornado, turned, past participle of tornar, to turn) of Early Modern English ternado, violent thunderstorm, hurricane from Spanish tronada, thunderstorm, from tronar, to thunder, from Latin tonāre; see (s)tenə- in Indo-European roots.]

tor·na′dic (-nā′dĭk, -năd′ĭk) adj.

tornado

(tɔːˈneɪdəʊ)
n, pl -does or -dos
1. (Physical Geography) Also called: cyclone or twister (US and Canadian informal)a violent storm with winds whirling around a small area of extremely low pressure, usually characterized by a dark funnel-shaped cloud causing damage along its path
2. (Physical Geography) a small but violent squall or whirlwind, such as those occurring on the West African coast
3. any violently active or destructive person or thing
4. (often capital) a type of dinghy, designed to be crewed by two people
[C16: probably alteration of Spanish tronada thunderstorm (from tronar to thunder, from Latin tonāre), through influence of tornar to turn, from Latin tornāre to turn in a lathe]
tornadic adj
torˈnado-ˌlike adj

tor•na•do

(tɔrˈneɪ doʊ)

n., pl. -does, -dos.
1. a localized, violently destructive windstorm occurring over land, esp. in the Middle West, and characterized by a long, funnel-shaped cloud that extends to the ground.
2. a violent squall or whirlwind of small extent, as one of those occurring during the summer on the W coast of Africa.
3. a violent outburst, as of emotion or activity.
[1550–60; appar. by metathesis < Sp tronada thunderstorm, n. use of feminine of tronado, past participle of tronar < Latin tonāre to thunder]
tor•nad′ic (-ˈnæd ɪk, -ˈneɪ dɪk) adj.

tor·na·do

(tôr-nā′dō)
A violently rotating column of air ranging in width from a few yards to more than a mile and whirling at speeds estimated at 300 miles (483 kilometers) an hour or higher. A tornado usually takes the form of a funnel-shaped cloud extending downward out of a cumulonimbus cloud. Where the funnel reaches the ground, it can cause enormous destruction.

tornado

a highly localized, violent windstorm occurring over land, usually in the U.S. Midwest, characterized by a vertical, funnel-shaped cloud.
See also: Wind

tornado

An intense cyclone where the spiraling wind-speed reaches over 200 miles (320km) per hour.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tornado - a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the groundtornado - a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground
cyclone - a violent rotating windstorm
supertwister - the most powerful tornado which can create enormously devastating damage; "supertwisters are fortunately rare"
waterspout - a tornado passing over water and picking up a column of water and mist
2.tornado - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snortedtornado - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted; highly addictive
cocain, cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive

tornado

noun whirlwind, storm, hurricane, gale, cyclone, typhoon, tempest, squall, twister (U.S. informal), windstorm The tornado tossed homes around like litter.
Translations
إعْصار دَوّاميإِعْصَارٌ قُمْعِيّاعصار
tornádo
tornado
pyörremyrskytornadotrombi
तूफान
tornado
tornádó
skÿstrókur; hvirfilbylur
竜巻トルネード
토네이도폭풍
tornadastrombasviesulas
tornado, viesuļvētra
tornado
tornadotromb
พายุทอร์นาโด
cơn lốc xoáy

tornado

[tɔːˈneɪdəʊ] N (tornados, tornadoes (pl)) → tornado m

tornado

[tɔːrˈneɪdəʊ] [tornadoes] (pl) ntornade f

tornado

n pl <-es> → Tornado m

tornado

[tɔːˈneɪdəʊ] n (tornadoes (pl)) → tornado

tornado

(toːˈneidəu) plural torˈnadoes noun
a violent whirlwind that can cause great damage. The village was destroyed by a tornado.

tornado

إِعْصَارٌ قُمْعِيّ tornádo tornado Tornado σίφουνας tornado pyörremyrsky tornade tornado tornado 竜巻 토네이도 tornado tornado tornado tornado торнадо tromb พายุทอร์นาโด kasırga cơn lốc xoáy 龙卷风
References in periodicals archive ?
The turbulence created by the intense winds created tornadic conditions over many of the islands impacted and as a result, it is expected that the local wind gusts may have far exceeded the sustained wind speed.
There have been many tornado damage claims as a result of the numerous tornadic rotations that moved through the Houston Metro area.
Elston received his PhD from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2011, developing a system and algorithms for UAS sampling of tornadic supercell thunderstorms.
The exhibit, which opened in April, contains photography detailing aftermath of tornadic activity in Tupelo.
Tornadic waterspouts form over water or move from land to water.
If military interventions often fail to achieve satisfactory political outcomes, they do--with much greater reliability-effect a tornadic reordering of those very political elements whose fortunate confluence is necessary for "favorable conflict resolution.
People who make a casual, careless remark on Twitter late one night can wake up the next morning to find their reputations and careers in ruins, as they become objects of swirling mob outrage that quickly grows to tornadic force, and, like some savage god, demands a public sacrifice to satisfy its appetite for blood.
The navigator keeps track of the aircraft's position and movement, and monitors radar to avoid tornadic activity.
The April 27, 2011, tornado outbreak, which was part of a series of destructive tornadic activity from April 25-28 across the eastern third of the country, was unimaginable.
Because of the operational challenges associated with tornadic weather and employee safety, an engineer evaluated the Midtown site, and designed steel-reinforced entrance doors to the buried aggregate pile's drawn-down tunnel--yielding a tornado shelter.