tornado

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Related to tornadoes: tsunami

tor·na·do

 (tôr-nā′dō)
n. pl. tor·na·does or tor·na·dos
1. A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the ground, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer, with destructive winds up to 510 kilometers (316 miles) per hour or higher. Tornadoes are typically associated with a funnel cloud pendant from a storm's wall cloud, often extending to the bottom of the tornado.
2. A violent thunderstorm in western Africa or nearby Atlantic waters.
3. A whirlwind or hurricane.

[Alteration (probably influenced by Spanish tornado, turned, past participle of tornar, to turn) of Early Modern English ternado, violent thunderstorm, hurricane from Spanish tronada, thunderstorm, from tronar, to thunder, from Latin tonāre; see (s)tenə- in Indo-European roots.]

tor·na′dic (-nā′dĭk, -năd′ĭk) adj.

tornado

(tɔːˈneɪdəʊ)
n, pl -does or -dos
1. (Physical Geography) Also called: cyclone or twister (US and Canadian informal)a violent storm with winds whirling around a small area of extremely low pressure, usually characterized by a dark funnel-shaped cloud causing damage along its path
2. (Physical Geography) a small but violent squall or whirlwind, such as those occurring on the West African coast
3. any violently active or destructive person or thing
4. (often capital) a type of dinghy, designed to be crewed by two people
[C16: probably alteration of Spanish tronada thunderstorm (from tronar to thunder, from Latin tonāre), through influence of tornar to turn, from Latin tornāre to turn in a lathe]
tornadic adj
torˈnado-ˌlike adj

tor•na•do

(tɔrˈneɪ doʊ)

n., pl. -does, -dos.
1. a localized, violently destructive windstorm occurring over land, esp. in the Middle West, and characterized by a long, funnel-shaped cloud that extends to the ground.
2. a violent squall or whirlwind of small extent, as one of those occurring during the summer on the W coast of Africa.
3. a violent outburst, as of emotion or activity.
[1550–60; appar. by metathesis < Sp tronada thunderstorm, n. use of feminine of tronado, past participle of tronar < Latin tonāre to thunder]
tor•nad′ic (-ˈnæd ɪk, -ˈneɪ dɪk) adj.

tor·na·do

(tôr-nā′dō)
A violently rotating column of air ranging in width from a few yards to more than a mile and whirling at speeds estimated at 300 miles (483 kilometers) an hour or higher. A tornado usually takes the form of a funnel-shaped cloud extending downward out of a cumulonimbus cloud. Where the funnel reaches the ground, it can cause enormous destruction.

tornado

a highly localized, violent windstorm occurring over land, usually in the U.S. Midwest, characterized by a vertical, funnel-shaped cloud.
See also: Wind

tornado

An intense cyclone where the spiraling wind-speed reaches over 200 miles (320km) per hour.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tornado - a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the groundtornado - a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground
cyclone - a violent rotating windstorm
supertwister - the most powerful tornado which can create enormously devastating damage; "supertwisters are fortunately rare"
waterspout - a tornado passing over water and picking up a column of water and mist
2.tornado - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snortedtornado - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted; highly addictive
cocain, cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive

tornado

noun whirlwind, storm, hurricane, gale, cyclone, typhoon, tempest, squall, twister (U.S. informal), windstorm The tornado tossed homes around like litter.
Translations
إعْصار دَوّاميإِعْصَارٌ قُمْعِيّاعصار
tornádo
tornado
pyörremyrskytornadotrombi
तूफान
tornado
tornádó
skÿstrókur; hvirfilbylur
竜巻トルネード
토네이도폭풍
tornadastrombasviesulas
tornado, viesuļvētra
tornado
tornadotromb
พายุทอร์นาโด
cơn lốc xoáy

tornado

[tɔːˈneɪdəʊ] N (tornados, tornadoes (pl)) → tornado m

tornado

[tɔːrˈneɪdəʊ] [tornadoes] (pl) ntornade f

tornado

n pl <-es> → Tornado m

tornado

[tɔːˈneɪdəʊ] n (tornadoes (pl)) → tornado

tornado

(toːˈneidəu) plural torˈnadoes noun
a violent whirlwind that can cause great damage. The village was destroyed by a tornado.

tornado

إِعْصَارٌ قُمْعِيّ tornádo tornado Tornado σίφουνας tornado pyörremyrsky tornade tornado tornado 竜巻 토네이도 tornado tornado tornado tornado торнадо tromb พายุทอร์นาโด kasırga cơn lốc xoáy 龙卷风
References in classic literature ?
Sideways leaning, we sideways darted; every ropeyarn tingling like a wire; the two tall masts buckling like Indian canes in land tornadoes.
Skies the most effulgent but basket the deadliest thunders: gorgeous Cuba knows tornadoes that never swept tame northern lands.
exclaimed the veteran; "don't preach about weather to a man that has cruised in whirlwinds and tornadoes.
Tornadoes, hurricanes, waterspouts, and tidal waves were so many obstacles to the way of a ship on the sea and of a master on the bridge--they were that to him, and nothing more.
Tornadoes present one of the biggest challenges to modeling for homeowners coverage.
Under clear skies, tens of thousands of residents across two states began grappling Tuesday with the aftermath of a series of monster tornadoes that killed at least 43 people, injured more than 500, destroyed more than 1,500 buildings and left behind mile after mile of twisted metal, denuded trees, crumpled cars and collapsed buildings.
The net result is a tornado/hail model that employs 800,000 stochastic events that simulate over 20 million tornadoes and 60 million hail streaks to enable the most refined analysis of risk available.
Days of severe weather, storms and tornadoes flatten homes in North Carolina suburbs before making way through St Louis International Airport leaving behind massive devastation.
Only about 5 percent of all tornadoes since 1950 have been an F3 or stronger.
The winner becomes part of the "Team Tornado," which will chase tornadoes with a special vehicle engineered to enter and record inside the eye.
According to the National Weather Service, about 70 tornadoes swept through cities and towns from Louisiana to Pennsylvania.