torpor


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Related to torpor: Daily torpor

tor·por

 (tôr′pər)
n.
1. A state of mental or physical inactivity or insensibility.
2. Lethargy; apathy. See Synonyms at lethargy.
3. The dormant, inactive state of a hibernating or estivating animal.

[Latin, from torpēre, to be stiff; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

tor′po·rif′ic (-pə-rĭf′ĭk) adj.

torpor

(ˈtɔːpə)
n
a state of torpidity
[C17: from Latin: inactivity, from torpēre to be motionless]
ˌtorporˈific adj

tor•por

(ˈtɔr pər)

n.
1. sluggish inactivity or inertia.
2. lethargic indifference; apathy.
3. a state of suspended physical powers and activities.
4. dormancy, as of a hibernating animal.
[1600–10; < Latin: numbness =torp(ēre) to be stiff or numb + -or -or1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.torpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibilitytorpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibility; "he fell into a deep torpor"
hibernation - the torpid or resting state in which some animals pass the winter
lassitude, lethargy, sluggishness - a state of comatose torpor (as found in sleeping sickness)
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
2.torpor - inactivity resulting from lethargy and lack of vigor or energytorpor - inactivity resulting from lethargy and lack of vigor or energy
passivity, passiveness - the trait of remaining inactive; a lack of initiative

torpor

torpor

noun
A deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity:
Translations

torpor

[ˈtɔːpəʳ] Nletargo m

torpor

[ˈtɔːrr] ntorpeur f

torpor

n (= lethargy)Trägheit f; (= apathy)Abgestumpftheit f; (Zool) → Torpidität f

torpor

[ˈtɔːpəʳ] n (frm) → torpore m

tor·por

n. embotamiento; estancamiento, inactividad física.
References in classic literature ?
She still lay back in the chair, possessed by a torpor like the torpor of death--insensible to sound, insensible to touch.
She was the only one of his family who could rouse the old man from the torpor in which he seemed to live.
But at last the roar of a bigger and nearer break than usual brought her out of her torpor, and she looked up, and her practiced eye fell upon that telltale rush of water.
Having, by repeated and prolonged assaults, at length completely gorged himself, he would wrap himself up and lie with the torpor of an anaconda; slowly digesting his way on to the next repast.
When there she threw herself on the bed with her clothes on, and lay in apparent torpor, as she had done once before on a memorable day of grief.
Habit also struggled successfully against Jerry's increasing torpor.
CLIFFORD, except for Phoebe's More active instigation would ordinarily have yielded to the torpor which had crept through all his modes of being, and which sluggishly counselled him to sit in his morning chair till eventide.
Like a man in fever, waking to intervals of consciousness, so Old Tarwater awoke, cooked his moose-meat, and fed the fire; but more and more time he spent in his torpor, unaware of what was day-dream and what was sleep-dream in the content of his unconsciousness.
I had never noticed this kind of torpor in her before.
Maggie, all this time, moved about with a quiescence and even torpor of manner, so contrasted with her usual fitful brightness and ardor, that Lucy would have had to seek some other cause for such a change, if she had not been convinced that the position in which Maggie stood between Philip and her brother, and the prospect of her self-imposed wearisome banishment, were quite enough to account for a large amount of depression.
But the complete torpor came at last: the fingers lost their tension, the arms unbent; then the little head fell away from the bosom, and the blue eyes opened wide on the cold starlight.
The thought of a duty unfulfilled shook off his torpor, and he hurried from the abode of drunkenness.