torrent


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tor·rent

 (tôr′ənt, tŏr′-)
n.
1. A turbulent, swift-flowing stream.
2. A heavy downpour; a deluge.
3. A heavy, uncontrolled flow: a torrent of insults; torrents of information.

[Latin torrēns, torrent-, from present participle of torrēre, to burn; see ters- in Indo-European roots.]

torrent

(ˈtɒrənt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a fast, voluminous, or violent stream of water or other liquid
2. an overwhelming flow of thoughts, words, sound, etc
3. (Computer Science) computing a file that controls the transfer of data in a BitTorrent system. See BitTorrent
adj
rare like or relating to a torrent
[C17: from French, from Latin torrēns (noun), from torrēns (adjective) burning, from torrēre to burn]

tor•rent

(ˈtɔr ənt, ˈtɒr-)

n.
1. a stream of water flowing with great rapidity and violence.
2. a rushing or abundant stream of anything.
3. a violent downpour of rain.
adj.
4. torrential.
[1595–1605; < Latin torrent-, s. of torrēns seething, literally, burning, present participle of torrēre to burn]

Torrent

 an overflowing river, hence, a rapid flood.
Examples: torrent of abuse, 1784; of eloquence; of ivy, 1864; of lace, 1880; of lava, 1858; of notes, 1826; of oaths; of passions, 1647; of rain, 1806; of smoke, 1821; of vices; of wind, 1782; of words.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.torrent - a heavy raintorrent - a heavy rain        
rain, rainfall - water falling in drops from vapor condensed in the atmosphere
2.torrent - a violently fast stream of water (or other liquid)torrent - a violently fast stream of water (or other liquid); "the houses were swept away in the torrent"
current, stream - a steady flow of a fluid (usually from natural causes); "the raft floated downstream on the current"; "he felt a stream of air"; "the hose ejected a stream of water"
3.torrent - an overwhelming number or amounttorrent - an overwhelming number or amount; "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"
good deal, great deal, hatful, lot, muckle, passel, peck, mickle, mint, quite a little, slew, spate, tidy sum, wad, stack, raft, mountain, pile, plenty, mass, batch, heap, deal, flock, pot, mess, sight - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "see the rest of the winners in our huge passel of photos"; "it must have cost plenty"; "a slew of journalists"; "a wad of money"

torrent

noun
1. stream, flow, rush, flood, tide, spate, cascade, gush, effusion, inundation A torrent of water rushed into the reservoir.
2. downpour, flood, shower, deluge, rainstorm The rain came down in torrents.
3. outburst, stream, barrage, hail, spate, outpouring, effusion He directed a torrent of abuse at me.

torrent

noun
An abundant, usually overwhelming flow or fall, as of a river or rain:
Chiefly British: spate.
Translations
سَيْل، وابِل
přívalproud
skybrudskylle
stríîur straumur
pilantis kaip iš kibiro
straume
selşiddetli akıntı

torrent

[ˈtɒrənt] N (lit, fig) → torrente m
it rained in torrentsllovía a cántaros
a torrent of abuseun torrente de insultos, una sarta de injurias

torrent

[ˈtɒrənt] n
[water] → torrent m
The rain came down in torrents → Il pleuvait à torrent., Il pleuvait à torrents.
a torrent of abuse → un torrent d'insultes

torrent

n (= river)reißender Strom; (fig, of lava) → Strom m; (of words, insults)Sturzbach m, → Schwall m, → Flut f; the rain came down in torrentsder Regen kam in wahren Sturzbächen herunter; a torrent of abuseein Schwall mvon Beschimpfungen

torrent

[ˈtɒrnt] n (also fig) → torrente m
we got caught in a torrent of rain → una pioggia torrenziale ci ha sorpresi

torrent

(ˈtorənt) noun
a rushing stream. The rain fell in torrents; She attacked him with a torrent of abuse.
torrential (təˈrenʃəl) adjective
of, or like, a torrent. torrential rain; The rain was torrential.
References in classic literature ?
But the waning day had such an inviting influence that we did not remain housed many moments, but struck out and followed a roaring torrent of ice-water up to its far source in a sort of little grass-carpeted parlor, walled in all around by vast precipices and overlooked by clustering summits of ice.
This rattling noise, night and day, may be heard along the whole course of the torrent.
From childhood's hour I have not been As others were - I have not seen As others saw - I could not bring My passions from a common spring - From the same source I have not taken My sorrow - I could not awaken My heart to joy at the same tone - And all I lov'd - I lov'd alone - Then - in my childhood - in the dawn Of a most stormy life - was drawn From ev'ry depth of good and ill The mystery which binds me still - From the torrent, or the fountain - From the red cliff of the mountain - From the sun that 'round me roll'd In its autumn tint of gold - From the lightning in the sky As it pass'd me flying by - From the thunder, and the storm - And the cloud that took the form(When the rest of Heaven was blue) Of a demon in my view -
Then followed a torrent of laughter and cheers: Then the ominous words "It's a Boo-"
So much to give the reader some idea of the secret watering-place of Yellowsands, situated at the mouth of that romantic little torrent, the river Sly.
There was no use of interrupting them, for, having taken a particular direction, nothing can moderate and change their course; it is a torrent of living flesh which no dam could contain.
She discharged a torrent of abuse on the master, and advised her mistress to quit all thoughts of a man who had never shown himself deserving of her.
The night that I have in memory was dark, the creek a torrent, swollen by a recent storm.
The electric light went out suddenly, and two enormous waterspouts broke over the bridge of the frigate, rushing like a torrent from stem to stern, overthrowing men, and breaking the lashings of the spars.
It was very dark indeed in the wood, for the lightning was now becoming infrequent, and the hail, which was pouring down in a torrent, fell in columns through the gaps in the heavy foliage.
In another direction were to be seen some of the sources of the Oregon, or Columbia, flowing to the northwest, past those towering landmarks the Three Tetons, and pouring down into the great lava plain; while, almost at the captain's feet, the Green River, or Colorado of the West, set forth on its wandering pilgrimage to the Gulf of California; at first a mere mountain torrent, dashing northward over a crag and precipice, in a succession of cascades, and tumbling into the plain where, expanding into an ample river, it circled away to the south, and after alternately shining out and disappearing in the mazes of the vast landscape, was finally lost in a horizon of mountains.
Soldiers were being swept beneath the boiling torrent, never to rise.