totalism


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totalism

(ˈtəʊtəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics the practice of a dictatorial one party state that regulates every form of life
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.totalism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in governmenttotalism - the principle of complete and unrestricted power in government
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
References in periodicals archive ?
Marx's system is also flawed because of its drift toward totalism.
The second is in establishing the specific features of this phenomenon in conditions of Russian post totalism.
The indifference of the federal government, the totalism of military establishment and the impotence of the provincial government do not bode well for Balochistan.
1) I prefer the use of totalism instead of totalitarianism since the latter term is inherently associated with the industrial interwar authoritarian states as well the "war societies" of the era, not to mention the latter word's suggestion of brutal coercion, something which need not automatically be the case in a totalist system.
Lanier targets the post-humanist philosophy he terms "cybernetic totalism.
She argues that an indoctrinatory tradition is one that seeks to implant "control beliefs" that result in ideological totalism.
The conditions in Western Europe may not be as bad, because of many reasons, although there is no immunity from neo-liberal totalism.
For example, he says that Kierkegaard confirmed Percy's proclivity for solitariness and Pierce tempted him toward totalism.
For analyses and evaluations of Sherman's methods and objectives, see MICHAEL FELLMAN, CITIZEN SHERMAN: A LIFE OF WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN 188-89 (1995) (describing Sherman's view of war as "moral totalism," and characterizing him as an "enormous terrorist"); J.
Robert Jay Lifton, Thought Reform and the Psychology of Totalism (London: Penguin, 1967); and Robert Jay Lifton, Destroying the World to Save It (New York: Metropolitan Books, 1999).