totally


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to·tal·ly

 (tōt′l-ē)
adv.
Entirely; wholly; completely.

to•tal•ly

(ˈtoʊt l i)

adv.
wholly; entirely; completely.
[1500–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.totally - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly')totally - to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly'); "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "it was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; "a whole new idea"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech

totally

totally

adverb
Translations
naprosto
fuldstændigttotalt
täysin
potpuno
algerlega
完全に
전부
popolnoma
totalt
โดยสิ้นเชิง
hoàn toàn

totally

[ˈtəʊtəlɪ] ADVtotalmente
such a compromise would be totally unacceptableun compromiso así sería totalmente or completamente or del todo inaceptable
he's not totally without principleno carece totalmente de principios
I'm still not totally convincedaún no estoy del todo convencido
a view which has been almost totally ignoreduna postura que ha sido ignorada casi por completo

totally

[ˈtəʊtəli] adv
(= completely) → totalement
He's totally useless → Il est complètement nul.
something totally different → quelque chose de totalement différent
(= strongly)
I totally disagree → Je suis en total désaccord., Je ne suis absolument pas d'accord.

totally

advvöllig, total

totally

[ˈtəʊtəlɪ] advcompletamente

total

(ˈtəutəl) adjective
whole; complete. What is the total cost of the holiday?; The car was a total wreck.
noun
the whole amount, ie of various sums added together. The total came to / was $10.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈtotalled
to add up or amount to. The doctor's fees totalled $200.
ˈtotally adverb
completely. I was totally unaware of his presence.
total up
to add up. He totalled up (the amount he had sold) at the end of the week.

totally

بِكَامِلِهِ naprosto totalt völlig εντελώς totalmente täysin totalement potpuno totalmente 完全に 전부 totaal fullstendig całkowicie totalmente полностью totalt โดยสิ้นเชิง tamamen hoàn toàn 完全地
References in classic literature ?
When he was three weeks old, he had an illness which left him totally blind.
Every thought filled with apprehension for the previous treasure he had concealed in the cavern, the young man started to his feet, totally regardless of the hazard he incurred by such an exposure.
Secondly: The ship Union, also of Nantucket, was in the year totally lost off the Azores by a similar onset, but the authentic particulars of this catastrophe I have never chanced to encounter, though from the whale hunters I have now and then heard casual allusions to it.
And that she should seem to consider me a spectacle, and totally overlook her own merits in that respect, was another puzzling thing, and a display of magnanimity, too, that was surprising in one so young.
Well, I never struck no such a hole as this before; I'm of the opinion it's a totally new kind of a hole.
In several ways his opinions were totally changed, and would never go back to what they were before, but the main structure of his character was not changed, and could not be changed.
The latter seemed totally insensible to all such sentiments.
Harriet certainly was not clever, but she had a sweet, docile, grateful disposition, was totally free from conceit, and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.
John Dashwood, by this pointed invitation to her brother, how totally she disregarded her disapprobation of the match.
He walked back discontentedly; and so fell into his father's clutches, totally unprepared for the pending announcement, in that formidable quarter, of his departure for London.
Military officers destitute of military knowledge; naval officers with no idea of a ship; civil officers without a notion of affairs; brazen ecclesiastics, of the worst world worldly, with sensual eyes, loose tongues, and looser lives; all totally unfit for their several callings, all lying horribly in pretending to belong to them, but all nearly or remotely of the order of Monseigneur, and therefore foisted on all public employments from which anything was to be got; these were to be told off by the score and the score.
As to her family, they were totally unworthy of her, and their sentiments were utterly indifferent to him, and they might - I quote his own expression - go to the Devil.