touristed


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touristed

(ˈtʊərɪstɪd)
adj
busy with tourists
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.touristed - visited by throngs of touriststouristed - visited by throngs of tourists; "of the three American Virgin islands St. Thomas is the most touristed"; "tourists descend in busloads...so the whole place is rather touristy"
popular - regarded with great favor, approval, or affection especially by the general public; "a popular tourist attraction"; "a popular girl"; "cabbage patch dolls are no longer popular"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Year after year, to no particular political advantage, McCain has travelled to distant, lightly touristed corners of the world, dragging along whatever senators or members of Congress he could, no matter their party or ideological persuasion.
Still, it can make a difference: Bleaching has been more severe in heavily touristed areas Hawaii, the Great Barrier Reef, the United States Virgin Islands among them and the stress of background pollutants makes even remote reefs less resilient to larger threats.
But this is Alentejo, one of Europe's least touristed areas, a far-flung, beautiful swathe of geography that takes in one third of all of Portugal but holds only 7 percent of its residents.
NEW YORK CITY -- (Continued) The Mercado was a mere six blocks north from the cathedral and the heavily touristed zocalo but, except for us, foreign visitors didnt seem to be much in evidence.
But what they relish most is the fact that they are not on touristed trails.
It's a lovely old walled city, touristed with being touristy, and the food easily lives up to lofty expectations.
Then there's the inevitable mad dash along the world-renowned, heavily touristed - especially during the November-February high season - but undoubtedly scenic Garden Route.
It will also begin distributing leaflets in heavily touristed areas warning against a trend that involves young criminals asking visitors to make donations to false charities or to sign false petitions.
In her introduction, Van de Pol acknowledges that prostitution enjoys a special legal protection in the present-day Netherlands but otherwise sets aside modern judgments in favor of a rich appreciation of a historical subculture that bears little, if any, relationship to the heavily touristed red light district of Amsterdam today.