trace


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Related to trace: Traceroute, Trace route

trace 1

 (trās)
n.
1.
a. A visible mark, such as a footprint, made or left by the passage of a person, animal, or thing.
b. Evidence or an indication of the former presence or existence of something; a vestige: left without a trace of having been there.
2.
a. An extremely small amount or barely perceivable indication: spoke with a trace of sarcasm.
b. A constituent, such as a chemical compound or element, present in quantities less than a standard limit.
3. A path or trail that has been beaten out by the passage of animals or people.
4. An act of researching or ascertaining the origin or location of something: put a trace on the phone call; asked for a trace on a lost package.
5. A line drawn by a recording instrument, such as a cardiograph.
6. Mathematics
a. The point at which a line, or the curve in which a surface, intersects a coordinate plane.
b. The sum of the elements of the principal diagonal of a matrix.
7. An engram.
v. traced, trac·ing, trac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To go along or follow (a path, for example): We traced the trail up the mountain.
b. To follow the course or trail of: trace a wounded deer.
2.
a. To ascertain the successive stages in the development or progress of: tracing the life cycle of an insect; trace the history of a family.
b. To discover or determine by searching or researching evidence: trace the cause of a disease.
c. To locate or ascertain the origin of: traced the money to a foreign bank account.
3.
a. To draw (a line or figure); sketch; delineate.
b. To form (letters) with special concentration or care.
4.
a. To copy by following lines seen through a sheet of transparent paper.
b. To follow closely (a prescribed pattern): The skater traced a figure eight.
5.
a. To imprint (a design) by pressure with an instrument on a superimposed pattern.
b. To make a design or series of markings on (a surface) by such pressure on a pattern.
6. To record (a variable), as on a graph.
v.intr.
1. To make one's way along a trail or course: We traced along the ridge.
2. To have origins; be traceable: linguistic features that trace to West Africa.
adj.
Occurring in extremely small amounts or in quantities less than a standard limit.

[Middle English, track, from Old French, from tracier, to trace, from Vulgar Latin *tractiāre, from Latin tractus, a dragging, course, from past participle of trahere, to draw.]

trace′a·bil′i·ty n.
trace′a·ble adj.
trace′a·bly adv.

trace 2

 (trās)
n.
1. One of two side straps or chains connecting a harnessed draft animal to a vehicle or whiffletree.
2. A bar or rod, hinged at either end to another part, that transfers movement from one part of a machine to another.
Idiom:
kick over the traces
To act in a way that contravenes social expectations or propriety: "As soon as the opportunity presented itself, [he] kicked over the traces and threw himself into a life of pleasure" (K.D. Reynolds).

[Middle English trais, from Old French, pl. of trait, a hauling, harness strap, from Latin tractus, a hauling, from past participle of trahere, to haul.]

trace

(treɪs)
n
1. a mark or other sign that something has been in a place; vestige
2. a tiny or scarcely detectable amount or characteristic
3. a footprint or other indication of the passage of an animal or person
4. (Mechanical Engineering) any line drawn by a recording instrument or a record consisting of a number of such lines
5. something drawn, such as a tracing
6. chiefly US a beaten track or path
7. (Psychology) the postulated alteration in the cells of the nervous system that occurs as the result of any experience or learning. See also memory trace, engram
8. (Mathematics) geometry the intersection of a surface with a coordinate plane
9. (Mathematics) maths the sum of the diagonal entries of a square matrix
10. (Linguistics) linguistics a symbol inserted in the constituent structure of a sentence to mark the position from which a constituent has been moved in a generative process
11. (Physical Geography) meteorol an amount of precipitation that is too small to be measured
12. archaic a way taken; route
vb
13. (tr) to follow, discover, or ascertain the course or development of (something): to trace the history of China.
14. (tr) to track down and find, as by following a trail
15. to copy (a design, map, etc) by drawing over the lines visible through a superimposed sheet of transparent paper or other material
16.
a. to draw or delineate a plan or diagram of: she spent hours tracing the models one at a time.
b. to outline or sketch (an idea, policy, etc): he traced out his scheme for the robbery.
17. (Art Terms) (tr) to decorate with tracery
18. (Textiles) (tr) to imprint (a design) on cloth, etc
19. (usually foll by back) to follow or be followed to source; date back: his ancestors trace back to the 16th century.
20. archaic to make one's way over, through, or along (something)
[C13: from French tracier, from Vulgar Latin tractiāre (unattested) to drag, from Latin tractus, from trahere to drag]
ˈtraceable adj
ˌtraceaˈbility, ˈtraceableness n
ˈtraceably adv
ˈtraceless adj
ˈtracelessly adv

trace

(treɪs)
n
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) either of the two side straps that connect a horse's harness to the swingletree
2. (Angling) angling a length of nylon or, formerly, gut attaching a hook or fly to a line
3. kick over the traces to escape or defy control
[C14 trais, from Old French trait, ultimately from Latin trahere to drag]

trace1

(treɪs)

n., v. traced, trac•ing, n.
1. a surviving mark, sign, or evidence of the former existence, influence, or action of some agent or event; vestige.
2. a barely discernible indication or evidence of some quantity, quality, characteristic, expression, etc.
3. an extremely small amount of some chemical component: a trace of copper in the ore.
4. traces, the series of footprints left by an animal.
5. the track left by the passage of a person, animal, or object.
6. precipitation of less than 0.005 in. (0.127 mm).
7. a trail or path, esp. through wild or open territory, made by the passage of people, animals, or vehicles.
8. a tracing, drawing, or sketch of something.
9. a lightly drawn line, as the record drawn by a self-registering instrument.
10. Math.
a. the intersection of two planes, or of a plane and a surface.
b. the sum of the elements along the principal diagonal of a square matrix.
v.t.
11. to follow the footprints, track, or traces of.
12. to follow (footprints, evidence, the history or course of something, etc.).
13. to follow the course, development, or history of: to trace a political movement.
14. to ascertain by investigation; discover.
15. to draw (a line, outline, figure, etc.).
16. to make a plan, diagram, or map of.
17. to copy (a drawing, plan, etc.) by following the lines of the original on a superimposed transparent sheet.
18. to make an impression or imprinting of (a design, pattern, etc.).
v.i.
19. to go back in history, ancestry, or origin.
20. to follow a course, trail, etc.
[1250–1300; Middle English: to make one's way, proceed < Middle French tracier < Vulgar Latin *tractiāre, derivative of Latin tractus, past participle of trahere to draw, drag]
trace′a•ble, adj.

trace2

(treɪs)

n.
either of the two straps, ropes, or chains by which a carriage, wagon, or the like is drawn by a harnessed horse or other draft animal.
Idioms:
kick over the traces, to throw off restraint; become independent or defiant.
[1300–50; Middle English trais < Middle French, pl. of trait strap for harness < Latin tractus dragging]

Trace

 of hares: hares collectively; a line or train of people, 1385.

trace


Past participle: traced
Gerund: tracing

Imperative
trace
trace
Present
I trace
you trace
he/she/it traces
we trace
you trace
they trace
Preterite
I traced
you traced
he/she/it traced
we traced
you traced
they traced
Present Continuous
I am tracing
you are tracing
he/she/it is tracing
we are tracing
you are tracing
they are tracing
Present Perfect
I have traced
you have traced
he/she/it has traced
we have traced
you have traced
they have traced
Past Continuous
I was tracing
you were tracing
he/she/it was tracing
we were tracing
you were tracing
they were tracing
Past Perfect
I had traced
you had traced
he/she/it had traced
we had traced
you had traced
they had traced
Future
I will trace
you will trace
he/she/it will trace
we will trace
you will trace
they will trace
Future Perfect
I will have traced
you will have traced
he/she/it will have traced
we will have traced
you will have traced
they will have traced
Future Continuous
I will be tracing
you will be tracing
he/she/it will be tracing
we will be tracing
you will be tracing
they will be tracing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tracing
you have been tracing
he/she/it has been tracing
we have been tracing
you have been tracing
they have been tracing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tracing
you will have been tracing
he/she/it will have been tracing
we will have been tracing
you will have been tracing
they will have been tracing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tracing
you had been tracing
he/she/it had been tracing
we had been tracing
you had been tracing
they had been tracing
Conditional
I would trace
you would trace
he/she/it would trace
we would trace
you would trace
they would trace
Past Conditional
I would have traced
you would have traced
he/she/it would have traced
we would have traced
you would have traced
they would have traced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trace - a just detectable amounttrace - a just detectable amount; "he speaks French with a trace of an accent"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
spark - a small but noticeable trace of some quality that might become stronger; "a spark of interest"; "a spark of decency"
2.trace - an indication that something has been presenttrace - an indication that something has been present; "there wasn't a trace of evidence for the claim"; "a tincture of condescension"
footprint - a trace suggesting that something was once present or felt or otherwise important; "the footprints of an earlier civilization"
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"
3.trace - a suggestion of some qualitytrace - a suggestion of some quality; "there was a touch of sarcasm in his tone"; "he detected a ghost of a smile on her face"
proffer, proposition, suggestion - a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection; "it was a suggestion we couldn't refuse"
4.trace - a drawing created by superimposing a semitransparent sheet of paper on the original image and copying on it the lines of the original imagetrace - a drawing created by superimposing a semitransparent sheet of paper on the original image and copying on it the lines of the original image
drawing - a representation of forms or objects on a surface by means of lines; "drawings of abstract forms"; "he did complicated pen-and-ink drawings like medieval miniatures"
5.trace - either of two lines that connect a horse's harness to a wagon or other vehicle or to a whiffletreetrace - either of two lines that connect a horse's harness to a wagon or other vehicle or to a whiffletree
harness - stable gear consisting of an arrangement of leather straps fitted to a draft animal so that it can be attached to and pull a cart
line - something (as a cord or rope) that is long and thin and flexible; "a washing line"
6.trace - a visible mark (as a footprint) left by the passage of person or animal or vehicletrace - a visible mark (as a footprint) left by the passage of person or animal or vehicle
print, mark - a visible indication made on a surface; "some previous reader had covered the pages with dozens of marks"; "paw prints were everywhere"
Verb1.trace - follow, discover, or ascertain the course of development of somethingtrace - follow, discover, or ascertain the course of development of something; "We must follow closely the economic development is Cuba" ; "trace the student's progress"
keep abreast, keep up, follow - keep informed; "He kept up on his country's foreign policies"
analyse, analyze, examine, study, canvass, canvas - consider in detail and subject to an analysis in order to discover essential features or meaning; "analyze a sonnet by Shakespeare"; "analyze the evidence in a criminal trial"; "analyze your real motives"
keep an eye on, watch over, watch, observe, follow - follow with the eyes or the mind; "Keep an eye on the baby, please!"; "The world is watching Sarajevo"; "She followed the men with the binoculars"
2.trace - make a mark or lines on a surfacetrace - make a mark or lines on a surface; "draw a line"; "trace the outline of a figure in the sand"
mark - make or leave a mark on; "the scouts marked the trail"; "ash marked the believers' foreheads"
construct - draw with suitable instruments and under specified conditions; "construct an equilateral triangle"
inscribe - draw within a figure so as to touch in as many places as possible
circumscribe - draw a line around; "He drew a circle around the points"
circumscribe - to draw a geometric figure around another figure so that the two are in contact but do not intersect
draw - engage in drawing; "He spent the day drawing in the garden"
draw - represent by making a drawing of, as with a pencil, chalk, etc. on a surface; "She drew an elephant"; "Draw me a horse"
write - mark or trace on a surface; "The artist wrote Chinese characters on a big piece of white paper"; "Russian is written with the Cyrillic alphabet"
3.trace - to go back over againtrace - to go back over again; "we retraced the route we took last summer"; "trace your path"
return - go or come back to place, condition, or activity where one has been before; "return to your native land"; "the professor returned to his teaching position after serving as Dean"
4.trace - pursue or chase relentlesslytrace - pursue or chase relentlessly; "The hunters traced the deer into the woods"; "the detectives hounded the suspect until they found him"
dog, give chase, go after, chase, tail, chase after, trail, track, tag - go after with the intent to catch; "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"; "the dog chased the rabbit"
ferret - hound or harry relentlessly
5.trace - discover traces oftrace - discover traces of; "She traced the circumstances of her birth"
detect, discover, notice, observe, find - discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of; "She detected high levels of lead in her drinking water"; "We found traces of lead in the paint"
6.trace - make one's course or travel along a path; travel or pass over, around, or along; "The children traced along the edge of the dark forest"; "The women traced the pasture"
go forward, proceed, continue - move ahead; travel onward in time or space; "We proceeded towards Washington"; "She continued in the direction of the hills"; "We are moving ahead in time now"
7.trace - copy by following the lines of the original drawing on a transparent sheet placed upon ittrace - copy by following the lines of the original drawing on a transparent sheet placed upon it; make a tracing of; "trace a design"; "trace a pattern"
re-create, copy - make a replica of; "copy that drawing"; "re-create a picture by Rembrandt"
8.trace - read with difficultytrace - read with difficulty; "Can you decipher this letter?"; "The archeologist traced the hieroglyphs"
read - interpret something that is written or printed; "read the advertisement"; "Have you read Salman Rushdie?"

trace

verb
1. search for, follow, seek out, track, determine, pursue, unearth, ascertain, hunt down I first went there to trace my roots.
2. find, track (down), discover, trail, detect, unearth, hunt down, ferret out, locate Police are anxious to trace a man seen leaving the house.
3. outline, chart, sketch, draw, map out, depict, mark out, delineate I traced the course of the river on the map.
4. copy, map, draft, outline, sketch, reproduce, draw over She learnt to draw by tracing pictures from story books.
noun
1. bit, drop, touch, shadow, suggestion, hint, dash, suspicion, tinge, trifle, whiff, jot, tincture, iota Wash them in cold water to remove all traces of sand.
2. remnant, remains, sign, record, mark, evidence, indication, token, relic, vestige The church has traces of fifteenth-century frescoes.
3. track, trail, footstep, path, slot, footprint, spoor, footmark He disappeared mysteriously without a trace.

trace

noun
1. A visible sign or mark of the passage of someone or something:
2. A mark or remnant that indicates the former presence of something:
verb
1. To follow the traces or scent of, as in hunting:
2. To pursue and locate:
Idiom: run to earth.
Translations
أَثَرأَثَر، عَلامَهمِقْدار ضَئيليَتَتَبَّع آثاريَرْسُم، يَنْسَخ صورَه
stopastopovatkopírovat
sporsporekalkereoverføre
jälki
trag
átmásolkinyomoz
merki, slóî, sporrekja slóîsnefill, votturtaka í gegn
자취
mikroelementainukopijuoti per kalkę
izsekotizzīmētkopētneliels daudzumspēdas
odkopírovaťvystopovať
izsleditisledslediti
spår
ร่องรอย
belirtieser miktarizizlemekkopyasın çıkarmak
dấu vết

trace

[treɪs]
A. N
1. (= sign) → rastro m, señal f
the search for traces of life on Marsla búsqueda de señales or indicios de vida en Marte
she wanted to remove all trace of him from the flatquería deshacerse de todo rastro de él en el piso
I've lost all trace of my relationsperdí todo contacto con mis familiares, les perdí la pista or el rastro a mis familiares
there was no trace of him having been thereno había ningún indicio or rastro de que hubiera estado allí
she had no trace of an accentno tenía ni pizca de acento
he showed no trace of shynessno dio muestras de timidez, no mostró señales de timidez
to disappear or vanish without (a) tracedesaparecer sin dejar huella or rastro
the group had a few hits then sank without traceel grupo tuvo unos cuantos éxitos y luego desapareció sin dejar huella or rastro
2. (= remains) → vestigio m
they found traces of an ancient settlementencontraron vestigios de un antiguo poblado
3. (= small amount) → rastro m
the blood test revealed traces of poisonel análisis de sangre reveló rastros de veneno
there was a trace of a smile on her facetenía el esbozo de una sonrisa en la cara
rinse well and remove all traces of soapenjuague bien y elimine cualquier rastro or resto de jabón
she said it without a trace of ironylo dijo sin (ningún) asomo de ironía
4. (Tech) (= line) → traza f
5. (= strap on harness) → tirante m, correa f
to kick over the tracesrebelarse, sacar los pies del plato or tiesto
B. VT
1. (= find) [+ missing document, fault] → localizar, encontrar; [+ missing person, suspect] → averiguar el paradero de, localizar, ubicar (LAm)
we have been unable to trace your letterno hemos podido localizar or encontrar su carta
I cannot trace any reference to itno encuentro ninguna referencia a eso
2. (= follow trail of) [+ person] → seguir la pista a
she was finally traced to a house in Sohole siguieron la pista hasta dar con ella en una casa del Soho
they traced the van to a car rental agencyaveriguaron que la furgoneta era de una agencia de alquiler de automóviles
3. (= find source of) [+ phone call] → averiguar el origen de
I can trace my family back to Elizabethan timeslas raíces de mi familia se remontan a la época isabelina
to trace a rumour back to its sourceaveriguar dónde se originó un rumor, seguir la pista de un rumor hasta llegar a su punto de partida
C. CPD trace element Noligoelemento m

trace

[ˈtreɪs]
ntrace f
a trace of sth → une trace de qch
there was no trace of it → il n'y en avait pas trace
There was no trace of the robbers → Il n'y avait aucune trace des voleurs.
without trace [disappear] → sans laisser de traces
to sink without trace → couler corps et biens
vt
(= draw) → décalquer
(= follow) → suivre
(= find) → retrouver la trace de
They were trying to trace her husband → Ils essayaient de retrouver la trace de son mari.
to trace one's roots → retrouver ses racines
to trace the source of sth → identifier l'origine de qch, Je pense avoir identifié l'origine du poison.
to trace sth back to sth → faire remonter qch à qch
British empiricism can be traced back to Hume and Locke → On peut faire remonter l'empirisme britannique à Hume et Locke.

trace

1
n
(= sign)Spur f; I can’t find any trace of your fileIhre Akte ist spurlos verschwunden; there’s no trace of itkeine Spur davon; to vanish without tracespurlos verschwinden; to sink without tracespurlos or ohne Spur versinken or untergehen; (fig also)sang- und klanglos untergehen; to lose all trace of somebody/somethingjdn/etw aus den Augen verlieren
(= small amount) (of poison, spice)Spur f; (of irony etc)Hauch m, → Spur f
vt
(= draw)zeichnen; (= copy)nachziehen, nachzeichnen; (with tracing paper) → durchpausen, abpausen; he traced his name in the sander malte seinen Namen in den Sand
(= follow trail of) trail, progress, developmentsverfolgen; stepsfolgen (+dat); to trace a phone calleinen Anruf zurückverfolgen; she was traced to a house in Sohoihre Spur führte zu einem Haus in Soho
(= find)ausfindig machen, auffinden; I can’t trace your fileich kann Ihre Akte nicht finden

trace

2
n (of harness)Zuggurt m, → Zugriemen m ? kick over

trace

1 [treɪs]
1. n (sign) → traccia
there was no trace of it → non ne restava traccia
to vanish without trace → sparire senza lasciar traccia
I've lost all trace of them → ho completamente perso le loro tracce
the postmortem revealed traces of poison in the blood → l'autopsia ha rivelato tracce di veleno nel sangue
2. vt
a. (draw) → tracciare; (with tracing paper) → ricalcare
b. (follow) → seguire (le tracce di); (find, locate) → rintracciare
I cannot trace any reference to the matter → non riesco a rintracciare alcun riferimento alla faccenda
trace back vt + adv they traced the weapon back to herehanno stabilito che l'arma proviene da qui
to trace back one's family to → rintracciare le origini della propria famiglia fino a

trace

2 [treɪs] n (of harness) → tirella
to kick over the traces (Brit) (fig) → sfuggire al controllo

trace

(treis) noun
1. a mark or sign left by something. There were traces of egg on the plate; There's still no trace of the missing child.
2. a small amount. Traces of poison were found in the cup.
verb
1. to follow or discover by means of clues, evidence etc. The police have traced him to London; The source of the infection has not yet been traced.
2. to make a copy of (a picture etc) by putting transparent paper over it and drawing the outline etc. I traced the map.
ˈtracing noun
a copy made by tracing. I made a tracing of the diagram.
trace elements
elements that are needed in small quantities for the growing and developing of animal and plant life.
ˈtracing-paper noun
thin transparent paper used for tracing.

trace

أَثَر stopa spor Spur ίχνος rastro, traza jälki trace trag traccia 자취 spoor spor ślad rasto, rastro след spår ร่องรอย belirti dấu vết 痕迹

trace

n. rastro, vestigio.
1. cantidad diminuta de un elemento químico;
2. marca visible;
v. trazar; rastrear, investigar.

trace

n traza (frec. pl); There is a trace of protein in your urine..Hay trazas de proteínas en su orina.
References in classic literature ?
Weeks have passed, but no trace of her has been discovered, and we relinquish all hope, tie a black ribbon to her basket, set aside her dish, and weep for her as one lost to us forever.
All the inhabitants were killed, and trace of the ancient city was lost forever.
The people asleep in those houses, I thought, tried to live like the mice in their own kitchens; to make no noise, to leave no trace, to slip over the surface of things in the dark.
The hot wind beating in my face made me think--without any connection that I can trace of a summer day in Kentucky, of a meadow that seemed as big as the ocean to the very little girl walking through the grass, which was higher than her waist.
The search proved fruitless; for so short and sudden had been the passage from the faint path the travelers had journeyed into the thicket, that every trace of their footsteps was lost in the obscurity of the woods.
It was almost in other voice, and with no trace of his previous exaggeration, that he said, "With pleasure.
We have already hinted that it is not our purpose to trace down the history of the Pyncheon family, in its unbroken connection with the House of the Seven Gables; nor to show, as in a magic picture, how the rustiness and infirmity of age gathered over the venerable house itself.
To observe and define his character, however, under such disadvantages, was as difficult a task as to trace out and build up anew, in imagination, an old fortress, like Ticonderoga, from a view of its grey and broken ruins.
If he had been wicked he would have "caught" it, and I should have caught it by the rebound--I should have found the trace.
Nor was the pulpit itself without a trace of the same sea-taste that had achieved the ladder and the picture.
Do ye see this dent, sir --removing his hat, and brushing aside his hair, and exposing a bowl-like cavity in his skull, but which bore not the slightest scarry trace, or any token of ever having been a wound -- Well, the captain there will tell you how that came here; he knows.
Cut the trace here, somebody, if you can't unhitch it