tracheal


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tra·che·a

 (trā′kē-ə)
n. pl. tra·che·ae (-kē-ē′) or tra·che·as
1. Anatomy A thin-walled, cartilaginous tube descending from the larynx to the bronchi and carrying air to the lungs. Also called windpipe.
2. Zoology One of the internal respiratory tubes of insects and some other terrestrial arthropods, which are connected to the spiracles and are used for gas exchange.
3. Botany A tracheary element.

[Middle English trache, from Medieval Latin trāchēa, from Late Latin trāchīa, from Greek (artēriā) trākheia, rough (artery), trachea (as opposed to the smooth vessels that carry blood and not air), feminine of trākhus, rough.]

tra′che·al adj.

tra•che•al

(ˈtreɪ ki əl)

adj.
1. pertaining to or connected with the trachea or tracheae.
2. of the nature of or composed of tracheae or vessels in plants.
[1700–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tracheal - relating to or resembling or functioning like a tracheatracheal - relating to or resembling or functioning like a trachea
Translations

tracheal

[trəˈkɪəl] adjtracheale

tra·che·al

a. traqueal, rel. a la tráquea;
___ stenosisestenosis ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
3] In addition, about half of the incidents reported to the fourth National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Difficult Airway Society describe that airway complications are related to primary problems with tracheal intubation, including failed intubation, delayed intubation, and 'cannot intubate cannot oxygenate' situation.
The structures that make up the posterior respiratory system of boto and tucuxi were evaluated macroscopically at the UFAC's Laboratory of Animal Anatomy (Center for Biological and Nature Sciences) and the following biometric parameters were taken: length, width and thickness of the components of the trachea, tracheal bronchus, main bronchi and lungs.
Tracheal endoscopy revealed an obstruction of approximately 90% of the tracheal lumen, in addition to mild suspected aspergillosis of the air sacs.
The failure rate of adequate pain control (proportion of patients with pain intensity on NRS of more than 3/10) at 30 minutes, at 12 hours and at 24 hours after tracheal extubation in the two groups of patients.
2006) indicated that only 4% of horses with tracheal mucus observed during endoscopy also had nasal discharge, that pulmonary auscultation of horses with tracheal mucus accumulation was often normal, and that coughing was usually absent in these horses.
Objective: To see whether betamethasone gel or lidocaine gel is superior in reducing the incidence of post-operative sore throat after tracheal extubation.
Patients were monitored for intraprocedural and postprocedural complications like: hemorrhage, stomal infection, injury to adjacent structures, arrhythmias, transient hypoxemia, transient hypotension, paratracheal insertion, pneumothorax, sub-cutaneous emphysema, loss of airway, accidental decannulation, tracheal ring fracture and new lung infiltrate or atelectasis.
Objective: To evaluate and compare the protective effects of salbutamol and montelukast in amelioration of insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig in vitro.
The most common late complication is granuloma formation; others include tracheal stenosis, bleeding, infection, and fistula development.
Tracheal bronchus is subdivided into supernumerary and displaced types.
In November 2011, the Hollistone MA-based company announced that a simpler procedure, a tracheal transplant, had been completed using stem cells grown in a bioreactor.
The first scientific report of tracheal intubation and artificial respiration is attributed to Vesalius, who in 1543 performed this in animals.