track down


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track

 (trăk)
n.
1.
a. A mark or succession of marks left by something that has passed.
b. A path, route, or course indicated by such marks: an old wagon track through the mountains.
2. A path along which something moves; a course: following the track of an airplane on radar.
3.
a. A course of action; a method of proceeding: on the right track for solving the puzzle.
b. An intended or proper course: putting a stalled project back on track.
4. A succession of ideas; a train of thought.
5. Awareness of something occurring or passing: keeping track of the score; lost all track of time.
6. Sports
a. A course laid out for running or racing.
b. Athletic competition on such a course; track events.
c. Track and field.
7. A rail or set of parallel rails upon which railroad cars or other vehicles run.
8. tracks The boundary, formerly often delineated by train tracks, that separates two neighborhoods of different social class: grew up on the wrong side of the tracks.
9. Either of the continuous metal belts with which vehicles such as bulldozers and tanks move over the ground.
10. A metal groove or ridge that holds, guides, and reduces friction for a moving device or apparatus.
11. Any of several courses of study to which students are assigned according to ability, achievement, or needs: academic, vocational, and general tracks.
12.
a. A distinct path, as along a length of film or magnetic tape, on which sound, images, or other information is recorded.
b. A distinct selection from an audio or video recording, usually containing an individual work or part of a larger work: the title track of an album.
c. One of two or more separate recordings that are combined so as to be replayed simultaneously, as in stereophonic sound reproduction: mixed the vocal track and instrumental track.
13. Computers
a. One of the concentric magnetic rings that form the separate data storage areas on a floppy disk or a hard disk.
b. A set of digital data encoded consecutively on an optical disc.
14. tracks Slang Needle marks on the skin from multiple intravenous injections, considered an indication of habitual drug use.
v. tracked, track·ing, tracks
v.tr.
1. To follow the tracks of; trail: tracking game through the forest.
2.
a. To leave marks made of (dirt or mud, for example) on a surface: The dog tracked mud on the rug.
b. To leave marks on (a floor, for example) when moving or traversing: You're tracking up my nice clean floor!
3.
a. To observe or monitor the course of (an aircraft, for example), as by radar.
b. To observe the progress of; follow: tracking the company's performance daily.
c. To determine or discover the location or origin of: tracked the money to an offshore account.
4. To equip with a track.
5. To assign (a student) to a curricular track.
v.intr.
1. To follow a course; travel: The storm is tracking up the coast.
2.
a. To keep a constant distance apart. Used of a pair of wheels.
b. To be in alignment: The gears are not tracking properly.
3.
a. To follow the undulations in the groove of a phonograph record. Used of a needle.
b. To move across magnetic heads. Used of magnetic tape.
4. To move in relation to a subject being filmed. Used of a camera or camera crew.
Phrasal Verb:
track down
To pursue until found or captured: tracked him down at the pub.
Idiom:
in (one's) tracks
Exactly where one is standing: stopped him right in his tracks.

[Middle English trak, from Old French trac, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

track′a·ble adj.
track′er n.

track down

vb
(tr, adverb) to find by tracking or pursuing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.track down - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals)track down - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods"
snipe - hunt or shoot snipe
whale - hunt for whales
still-hunt, ambush - hunt (quarry) by stalking and ambushing
turtle - hunt for turtles, especially as an occupation
drive - hunting: chase from cover into more open ground; "drive the game"
drive - hunting: search for game; "drive the forest"
rabbit - hunt rabbits
fowl - hunt fowl in the forest
poach - hunt illegally; "people are poaching elephants for their ivory"
seal - hunt seals
ferret - hunt with ferrets
hunt - search (an area) for prey; "The King used to hunt these forests"
course - hunt with hounds; "He often courses hares"
foxhunt - hunt foxes, on horseback and with dogs
jacklight, jack - hunt with a jacklight
hawk - hunt with hawks; "the tribes like to hawk in the desert"
falcon - hunt with falcons; "The tribes like to falcon in the desert"
fowl - hunt fowl
capture, catch - capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping; "I caught a rabbit in the trap today"
run - cause an animal to move fast; "run the dogs"
forage, scrounge - collect or look around for (food)

track

noun
1. A visible sign or mark of the passage of someone or something:
2. Evidence of passage left along a course followed by a hunted animal or fugitive:
3. A course of action to be followed regularly:
round (often used in plural), routine.
verb
1. To follow the traces or scent of, as in hunting:
2. To keep (another) under surveillance by moving along behind:
Informal: bird-dog, tail.
3. To go across:
phrasal verb
track down
To pursue and locate:
Idiom: run to earth.
Translations
يَتَتَبَّعُيَتَعَقَّب الشَّخْص حتى يُمْسِك بِه
vypátrat
opspore
jäljittää
pronaći
lenyomoz
elta uppi, hafa uppi á
跡をたどって見つけ出す
찾아내다
vypátrať
spåra upp
ติดตามจนพบ
izini bulmakizini sürmek
tìm ra

w>track down

vt sepaufspüren (→ to in +dat); thingaufstöbern, auftreiben (inf), → finden; reference, source of infectionausfindig machen

track

(trӕk) noun
1. a mark left, especially a footprint etc. They followed the lion's tracks.
2. a path or rough road. a mountain track.
3. (also ˈracetrack) a course on which runners, cyclists etc race. a running track; (also adjective) the 100 metres sprint and other track events.
4. a railway line.
verb
to follow (eg an animal) by the marks, footprints etc that it has left. They tracked the wolf to its lair.
ˈtrack-suit noun
a warm suit worn by athletes etc when exercising, or before and after performing.
in one's tracks
where one stands or is. He stopped dead in his tracks.
keep/lose track of
(not) to keep oneself informed about (the progress or whereabouts of). I've lost track of what is happening.
make tracks (for)
to depart, or set off (towards). We ought to be making tracks (for home).
track down
to pursue or search for (someone or something) until it is caught or found. I managed to track down an old copy of the book.
ˈtracker dog noun
a dog that is trained to find people, drugs, explosives etc.

track down

يَتَتَبَّعُ vypátrat opspore aufspüren εντοπίζω localizar jäljittää dépister pronaći rintracciare 跡をたどって見つけ出す 찾아내다 opsporen spore opp wytropić localizar выслеживать spåra upp ติดตามจนพบ izini sürmek tìm ra 追查到
References in classic literature ?
Now would he track down the crafty Sabor and slay her likewise.
As their course lay north, they had to ascend the southern faces of the heights, where the sun had melted the snow, so as to render the ascent wet and slippery, and to keep both men and horses continually on the strain; while on the northern sides, the snow lay in such heavy masses, that it was necessary to beat a track down which the horses might be led.
To escape, to track down Sholto, to have my hand upon his throat,--that was my one thought.
Appreciation of Nature found no place among his many gifts, and his only change was when he turned his mind from the evil-doer of the town to track down his brother of the country.
Thus confronted at a distance of only a few feet by the real body of the woman about whom he had dreamt so many million dreams, Ralph stammered; he made a clutch at his self-control; the color either came to his cheeks or left them, he knew not which; but he was determined to face her and track down in the cold light of day whatever vestige of truth there might be in his persistent imaginations.
Kirsty and Chris are also keen to track down the first landlord and landlady of the Flying Scotsman when it opened on the site of the former railway station over 40 years ago.
A charity is hoping to track down families who received food parcels from the USA at the end of World War Two.
CHOICE Ron Williams Long Lost Family ITV, 9pm Peter Gunn, a 39-year-old man whose birth mother gave him up for adoption when he was only nine months old, sets out to track down his biological mum.
Carnival organiser Glenda Lewin said: "It was shame we couldn't track down Michelle - we tried Facebook and other social websites without any luck.
According by defence reports, army's 7 Gadhwal launched a massive hunt to track down the militant groups who were hiding in the forests since the last couple of days.
Violators and Foreigners Follow-up section of Fujairah Police has conducted many organised crackdowns to track down and arrest illegal residents, after being tipped off about the presence of illegal residents in Dibba Fujairah.
And now Peter Sullivan who received the photo wants to track down the true owner and he has uploaded it to Facebook in the hope it will be shared globally.