tracking shot


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tracking shot

n.
A movie shot made by a camera moving steadily on a track or dolly.

tracking shot

n
(Film) a camera shot in which the cameraman follows a specific person or event in the action

track′ing shot`


n.
a camera shot taken from a moving dolly.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They were unaware one of the world's most celebrated action stars was above them being filmed, presumably, in a tracking shot.
It's a conflicted moment the Bowie tune accompanies, and Alex responds by pitching himself down the street, carrying the sax-driven refrain with him in an extravagant tracking shot of athleticism -- airborne summersaults, shadow-boxing, etc.
The titular conundrum is elegantly bookmarked by a luxurious tracking shot along the platform in Istanbul, which follows the Belgian detective as he wanders through the train, and a five-minute Steadicam shot inside the carriages as a morally conflicted Poirot prepares to disembark.
The titular conundrum is elegantly bookmarked by a luxurious tracking shot along platform in Istanbul, which follows the Belgian detective as wanders through the train, and five-minute Steadicam shot the carriages as a morally conflicted Poirot prepares to disembark.
Mr Lin said the billionaire CEO arrived with plenty of security for a day of filming and waited patiently for crews to shoot the single tracking shot that includes his character.
The fluidity of a tracking shot can make or break an intense moment in your film.
This arrangement forced visitors to traverse the entire space before being able to see the film, their bodies tracing a path similar to the one Siegel's camera took through the ten offices, thereby performing another sort of tracking shot.
This is when Trotter describes how the use of a tracking shot intensifies the emotional impact of a scene in the film Cabiria (1914).
As with those earlier films, Wright cannot convey emotion in a single image when he can orchestrate an intricate tracking shot or a complex sequence littered with hundreds of real-life homeless extras on a graffiti-strewn recreation of Skid Row.
They include the first tracking shot from the city's Overhead Railway.
The opening, seemingly never-ending tracking shot sweeps down the aisle of an electronics factory in the "workshop of the word", and Chinese villages are the backdrop as Burtynsky snaps workers dismantling so-called "e-waste" (50% of the West's obsolete computers, the documentary claims, are sent to China) with their hands, hammering away to prise still valuable shreds of copper from circuit boards and components.