trades


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trade

 (trād)
n.
1. The business of buying and selling commodities, products, or services; commerce. See Synonyms at business.
2. A branch or kind of business: the women's clothing trade.
3. The people working in or associated with a business or industry: writers, editors, and other members of the publishing trade.
4. The activity or volume of buying or selling: The trade in stocks was brisk all morning.
5. An exchange of one thing for another: baseball teams making a trade of players.
6. An occupation, especially one requiring skilled labor; craft: the building trades.
7. trades The trade winds.
v. trad·ed, trad·ing, trades
v.intr.
1. To engage in buying and selling for profit.
2. To make an exchange of one thing for another.
3. To be offered for sale or be sold: Stocks traded at lower prices this morning.
4. To shop or buy regularly: trades at the local supermarket.
v.tr.
1. To give in exchange for something else: trade farm products for manufactured goods; will trade my ticket for yours.
2. To buy and sell (stocks, for example).
3. To pass back and forth: We traded jokes.
adj.
1. Of or relating to trade or commerce.
2. Relating to, used by, or serving a particular trade: a trade magazine.
3. Of or relating to books that are primarily published to be sold commercially, as in bookstores.
Phrasal Verbs:
trade down
To trade something in for something else of lower value or price: bought a new, smaller car, trading the old one down for economy.
trade in
To surrender or sell (an old or used item), using the proceeds as partial payment on a new purchase.
trade on
To put to calculated and often unscrupulous advantage; exploit: children of celebrities who trade on their family names.
trade up
To trade something in for something else of greater value or price: The value of our house soared, enabling us to trade up to a larger place.

[Middle English, course, from Middle Low German.]

trad′a·ble, trade′a·ble adj.
Translations

trades

:
tradesman
n (= delivery man)Lieferant m; (= shopkeeper)Händler m, → Ladenbesitzer m; (= plumber, electrician etc)Handwerker m; trades’s entranceLieferanteneingang m
tradespeople
plGeschäftsleute pl, → Händler pl
trades union
n (Brit) = trade union; Trades Union Congress(britischer) Gewerkschaftsbund
tradeswoman
n (= shopkeeper)Händlerin f, → Ladenbesitzerin f; (= plumber, electrician etc)Handwerkerin f
References in classic literature ?
Like all sea-going ship carpenters, and more especially those belonging to whaling vessels, he was, to a certain off-handed, practical extent, alike experienced in numerous trades and callings collateral to his own; the carpenter's pursuit being the ancient and outbranching trunk of all those numerous handicrafts which more or less have to do with wood as an auxiliary material.
One big butcher, who was president of the Packing Trades Council, had been passed over five times, and the men were wild with rage; they had appointed a committee of three to go in and see the superintendent, and the committee had made three attempts, and each time the police had clubbed them back from the door.
Dashwood, "since leisure has not promoted your own happiness, that your sons will be brought up to as many pursuits, employments, professions, and trades as Columella's.
But indeed, at that time, putting to death was a recipe much in vogue with all trades and professions, and not least of all with Tellson's.
Poulterers' and grocers' trades became a splendid joke; a glorious pageant, with which it was next to impossible to believe that such dull principles as bargain and sale had anything to do.
Put this and that together, my tender pupil,' returned the wary Mowcher, touching her nose, 'work it by the rule of Secrets in all trades, and the product will give you the desired result.
After this memorable event, I went to the hatter's, and the bootmaker's, and the hosier's, and felt rather like Mother Hubbard's dog whose outfit required the services of so many trades.
Miss Wilson confirmed Fairholme's account; and the church organist, who had tuned all the pianofortes in the neighborhood once a year for nearly a quarter of a century, denounced the newcomer as Jack of all trades and master of none.
We had run up the trades to get the wind of the island we were after--I am not allowed to be more plain--and now we were running down for it with a bright lookout day and night.
The nurseries for children of ordinary gentlemen, merchants, traders, and handicrafts, are managed proportionably after the same manner; only those designed for trades are put out apprentices at eleven years old, whereas those of persons of quality continue in their exercises till fifteen, which answers to twenty-one with us: but the confinement is gradually lessened for the last three years.
To the general public, it was a mere scientific toy; but there were a few men, not many, in these wire-stringing trades, who saw a glimmering chance of creating a telephone business.
Don't set yourself to wrangle with me, husband," said Teresa; "I speak as God pleases, and don't deal in out-of-the-way phrases; and I say if you are bent upon having a government, take your son Sancho with you, and teach him from this time on how to hold a government; for sons ought to inherit and learn the trades of their fathers.