trades


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trade

 (trād)
n.
1. The business of buying and selling commodities, products, or services; commerce. See Synonyms at business.
2. A branch or kind of business: the women's clothing trade.
3. The people working in or associated with a business or industry: writers, editors, and other members of the publishing trade.
4. The activity or volume of buying or selling: The trade in stocks was brisk all morning.
5. An exchange of one thing for another: baseball teams making a trade of players.
6. An occupation, especially one requiring skilled labor; craft: the building trades.
7. trades The trade winds.
v. trad·ed, trad·ing, trades
v.intr.
1. To engage in buying and selling for profit.
2. To make an exchange of one thing for another.
3. To be offered for sale or be sold: Stocks traded at lower prices this morning.
4. To shop or buy regularly: trades at the local supermarket.
v.tr.
1. To give in exchange for something else: trade farm products for manufactured goods; will trade my ticket for yours.
2. To buy and sell (stocks, for example).
3. To pass back and forth: We traded jokes.
adj.
1. Of or relating to trade or commerce.
2. Relating to, used by, or serving a particular trade: a trade magazine.
3. Of or relating to books that are primarily published to be sold commercially, as in bookstores.
Phrasal Verbs:
trade down
To trade something in for something else of lower value or price: bought a new, smaller car, trading the old one down for economy.
trade in
To surrender or sell (an old or used item), using the proceeds as partial payment on a new purchase.
trade on
To put to calculated and often unscrupulous advantage; exploit: children of celebrities who trade on their family names.
trade up
To trade something in for something else of greater value or price: The value of our house soared, enabling us to trade up to a larger place.

[Middle English, course, from Middle Low German.]

trad′a·ble, trade′a·ble adj.
Translations

trades

:
tradesman
n (= delivery man)Lieferant m; (= shopkeeper)Händler m, → Ladenbesitzer m; (= plumber, electrician etc)Handwerker m; trades’s entranceLieferanteneingang m
tradespeople
plGeschäftsleute pl, → Händler pl
trades union
n (Brit) = trade union; Trades Union Congress(britischer) Gewerkschaftsbund
tradeswoman
n (= shopkeeper)Händlerin f, → Ladenbesitzerin f; (= plumber, electrician etc)Handwerkerin f
References in classic literature ?
Of all the trades in the world, there is only one that really suits me.
If you do not like going to school, why don't you at least learn a trade, so that you can earn an honest living?
It was the fur trade, in fact, which gave early sustenance and vitality to the great Canadian provinces.
In this way the trade augmented, and was drawn from remote quarters to Montreal.
For were it not for this lazy trade of usury, money would not he still, but would in great part be employed upon merchandizing; which is the vena porta of wealth in a state.
On the other side, the commodities of usury are, first, that howsoever usury in some respect hindereth merchandizing, yet in some other it advanceth it; for it is certain that the greatest part of trade is driven by young merchants, upon borrowing at interest; so as if the usurer either call in, or keep back, his money, there will ensue, presently, a great stand of trade.
State of the fur trade of the Rocky Mountains American enterprises General Ashley and his associates Sublette, a famous leader Yearly rendezvous among the mountains Stratagems and dangers of the trade Bands of trappers Indian banditti Crows and Blackfeet Mountaineers Traders of the Far West Character and habits of the trapper
John Jacob Astor to establish an American emporium for the fur trade at the mouth of the Columbia, or Oregon River; of the failure of that enterprise through the capture of Astoria by the British, in 1814; and of the way in which the control of the trade of the Columbia and its dependencies fell into the hands of the Northwest Company.
The Levant Trade does occasionally get into difficulties.
It appeared he had "served his time" in the copper-ore trade, the famous copper-ore trade of old days between Swansea and the Chilian coast, coal out and ore in, deep-loaded both ways, as if in wanton defiance of the great Cape Horn seas - a work, this, for staunch ships, and a great school of staunchness for West- Country seamen.
The popular system of administration inherent in the nature of popular government, coinciding with the real scarcity of money incident to a languid and mutilated state of trade, has hitherto defeated every experiment for extensive collections, and has at length taught the different legislatures the folly of attempting them.
Then the butchers saw that they must meet craft with craft; and they said to him, "Come, brother butcher, if you would sell meat with us, you must e'en join our guild and stand by the rules of our trade.