tradition


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tra·di·tion

 (trə-dĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The passing down of elements of a culture from generation to generation, especially by oral communication: cultural practices that are preserved by tradition.
2.
a. A mode of thought or behavior followed by a people continuously from generation to generation; a custom or usage: the traditions of Tibetan Buddhism.
b. A set of such customs and usages viewed as a coherent body of precedents influencing the present: followed family tradition in dress and manners. See Synonyms at heritage.
3. A precept or a body of precepts that are not written in the sacred book of a religion, such as the Bible, but are considered holy or true.
4. A style or method of an activity or practice, especially of artistic expression, that is recognized and sometimes imitated: satire in the tradition of Jonathan Swift.
5. A piece of folklore: "a popular medieval tradition that identified the queen of Sheba with the Blessed Virgin Mary" (Nicholas Clapp).

[Middle English tradicioun, from Old French, from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, from trāditus, past participle of trādere, to hand over, deliver, entrust : trā-, trāns-, trans- + dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]

tradition

(trəˈdɪʃən)
n
1. the handing down from generation to generation of the same customs, beliefs, etc, esp by word of mouth
2. the body of customs, thought, practices, etc, belonging to a particular country, people, family, or institution over a relatively long period
3. a specific custom or practice of long standing
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a doctrine or body of doctrines regarded as having been established by Christ or the apostles though not contained in Scripture
5. (Judaism) (often capital) Judaism a body of laws regarded as having been handed down from Moses orally and only committed to writing in the 2nd century ad
6. (Islam) the beliefs and customs of Islam supplementing the Koran, esp as embodied in the Sunna
7. (Law) law chiefly Roman law Scots law the act of formally transferring ownership of movable property; delivery
[C14: from Latin trāditiō a handing down, surrender, from trādere to give up, transmit, from trans- + dāre to give]
traˈditionless adj
traˈditionist n

tra•di•tion

(trəˈdɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the handing down of statements, beliefs, legends, customs, etc., from generation to generation, esp. by word of mouth or by practice.
2. something that is so handed down: the traditions of the Eskimos.
3. a long-established or inherited way of thinking or acting: a break with tradition.
4.
a. (among Jews) a body of laws and doctrines, or any one of them, held to have been received from Moses and orig. handed down orally from generation to generation.
b. (among Christians) a body of teachings, or any one of them, held to have been delivered by Christ and His apostles but not orig. committed to writing.
[1350–1400; Middle English tradicion < Old French < Latin trāditiō handing over, transfer <trādi, variant s. of trādere to give over (trā-, variant of trāns- trans- + -dere, comb. form of dare to give)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tradition - an inherited pattern of thought or actiontradition - an inherited pattern of thought or action
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
2.tradition - a specific practice of long standingtradition - a specific practice of long standing
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
habit, wont - an established custom; "it was their habit to dine at 7 every evening"
Hadith - (Islam) a tradition based on reports of the sayings and activities of Muhammad and his companions
institution - a custom that for a long time has been an important feature of some group or society; "the institution of marriage"; "the institution of slavery"; "he had become an institution in the theater"

tradition

noun
1. customs, institution, ritual, folklore, lore, praxis a country steeped in tradition
2. custom, convention, habit, ritual, unwritten law, established practice She has carried on the family tradition of giving away plants.
3. style, movement, method They're marvellous pictures in the tradition of Gainsborough.

tradition

noun
1. Something immaterial, as a style or philosophy, that is passed from one generation to another:
2. A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
Translations
تَقْليدتَقْلِيدعُرْف، عادات
tradice
traditionoverlevering
perinne
tradicija
régi szokás
erfîavenja, arfsögnhefî, erfîavenja
伝統
전통
tradicijatradiciškai
tradīcija
tradicija
tradition
ประเพณี
gelenekinanç v.bgeçmişten bugüne aktarılan âdet
truyền thống

tradition

[trəˈdɪʃən] Ntradición f
according to traditionde acuerdo con la tradición
tradition has it thatsegún la tradición ...
in the (best) tradition ofa la mejor usanza de
it is a tradition thates tradición que ...

tradition

[trəˈdɪʃən]
n
(= custom, practice) → tradition f
(= traditional ways) → tradition f
according to tradition → selon la tradition
in the tradition of sb/sth → dans la tradition de qn/qch

tradition

nTradition f; village traditionsDorfbräuche plor -traditionen plor -brauchtum nt; it has become a tradition for the chairman to propose the first toastes ist jetzt so üblich or ist zum festen Brauch geworden, dass der Vorsitzende den ersten Toast ausbringt; according to tradition he …, tradition has it that he …es ist überliefert, dass er …; there is a tradition in the village that Queen Mary slept hereim Dorf erzählt man sich, dass Königin Mary dort übernachtet hat; in the French traditionin der französischen Tradition; in the best tradition (of …)nach bester Tradition (+gen)

tradition

[trəˈdɪʃn] ntradizione f traditions npltradizioni, usanze fpl

tradition

(trəˈdiʃən) noun
1. (the process of passing on from generation to generation) customs, beliefs, stories etc. These songs have been preserved by tradition.
2. a custom, belief, story etc that is passed on.
traˈditional adjective
traˈditionally adverb

tradition

تَقْلِيد tradice tradition Tradition παράδοση tradición perinne tradition tradicija tradizione 伝統 전통 traditie tradisjon tradycja tradição традиция tradition ประเพณี gelenek truyền thống 传统
References in classic literature ?
If Sherley Bentley, the woman who came each night to sit on the floor by his bedside, did not appear at once, he went to the head of the stairs and shouted, his young voice ringing through the narrow halls where for so long there had been a tradition of silence.
The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings.
Our acquaintance with the whole subject is derived chiefly from tradition.
The figure of that first ancestor, invested by family tradition with a dim and dusky grandeur, was present to my boyish imagination as far back as I can remember.
He could do what he liked, with all his cleverness to help him, so long as I should continue to defer to the old tradition of the criminality of those caretakers of the young who minister to superstitions and fears.
In old Norse times, the thrones of the sea-loving Danish kings were fabricated, saith tradition, of the tusks of the narwhale.
This American government--what is it but a tradition, though a recent one, endeavoring to transmit itself unimpaired to posterity, but each instant losing some of its integrity?
Then who can hope to know what my feelings were, to hear this armor- plated ass start in on it again, in the murky twilight of tradition, before the dawn of history, while even Lactantius might be referred to as "the late Lactan- tius," and the Crusades wouldn't be born for five hundred years yet?
The common folk held him dear, and his memory is still green in ballad and tradition.
They wouldn't do it then, only earthly tradition makes a grand show pretty necessary on that kind of an occasion.
It is falling now; it will still be falling when all these things shall have sunk down the afternoon of history, and the twilight of tradition, and been swallowed up in the thick night of oblivion.
Jorkins was not by any means the awful creature one might have expected, but a large, mild, smooth-faced man of sixty, who took so much snuff that there was a tradition in the Commons that he lived principally on that stimulant, having little room in his system for any other article of diet.