trafficking


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traf·fic

 (trăf′ĭk)
n.
1.
a. The passage of people or vehicles along routes of transportation.
b. Vehicles or pedestrians in transit: heavy traffic on the turnpike; stopped oncoming traffic to let the children cross.
2.
a. The commercial exchange of goods; trade.
b. Illegal or improper commercial activity: drug traffic on city streets. See Synonyms at business.
3.
a. The business of moving passengers and cargo through a transportation system.
b. The amount of cargo or number of passengers conveyed.
4.
a. The conveyance of messages or data through a system of communication: routers that manage internet traffic.
b. Messages or data conveyed through such a system: a tremendous amount of telephone traffic on Mother's Day; couldn't download the file due to heavy internet traffic.
c. The number of users or visitors, as at a website: attempted to increase traffic with a redesigned homepage.
5. Social or verbal exchange; communication: refused further traffic with the estranged friend.
v. traf·ficked, traf·fick·ing, traf·fics
intr.v.
To carry on trade or other dealings: trafficked in liquidation merchandise; traffic with gangsters.
tr.v.
To provide to others, especially in large quantities, in exchange for money: was accused of trafficking guns to local gangs.

[French trafic, from Old French trafique, from Old Italian traffico, from trafficare, to trade, perhaps from Catalan trafegar, to decant, from Vulgar Latin *trānsfaecāre : trāns-, trans- + faex, faec-, dregs; see feces.]

traf′fick·er n.

trafficking

(ˈtræfɪkɪŋ)
n
(Commerce) the act of conducting trade or business, esp of an illicit kind
Translations

trafficking

[ˈtræfɪkɪŋ] ntrafic m
drug trafficking → le trafic de droguetraffic lights nplfeux mpl de signalisationtraffic offence n (British)infraction f au code de la routetraffic police npolice f de la routetraffic sign npanneau m de signalisationtraffic violation n (US) = traffic offencetraffic warden n (British)contractuel(le) m/f

trafficking

nHandel m(in mit); (in illegal alcohol) → Schieberei f(in von); (in pornography) → Vertrieb m(in von)
References in classic literature ?
careless of dispensing the bread of life to their flocks, preaching at best but a carnal and soul-benumbing morality, and trafficking in the souls of men by receiving money for discharging the pastoral office in parishes where they did not so much as look on the faces of the people more than once a-year.
Amid the occupations or amusements of the Fair, nothing was more common than for a person--whether at feast, theatre, or church, or trafficking for wealth and honors, or whatever he might be doing, to vanish like a soap bubble, and be never more seen of his fellows; and so accustomed were the latter to such little accidents that they went on with their business as quietly as if nothing had happened.
And thus adventuring, white men and indigenous black men from day to day lived life in the Solomons, bickering and trafficking, the whites striving to maintain their heads on their shoulders, the blacks striving, no less single-heartedly, to remove the whites' heads from their shoulders and at the same time to keep their own anatomies intact.
Oh, I skip much of the details of my trafficking with John Barleycorn during this period, and shall only mention events that will throw light on John Barleycorn's ways.