tragic irony


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Related to tragic irony: dramatic irony, ironic

tragic irony

n.
Dramatic irony in a tragedy.

tragic irony

n
(Theatre) the use of dramatic irony in a tragedy (originally, in Greek tragedy), so that the audience is aware that a character's words or actions will bring about a tragic or fatal result, while the character himself is not

trag′ic i′rony



n.
dramatic irony in tragic drama.
[1825–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pagliacci is based on a true story about the tragic irony in the life of a theatre clown, Canio who makes people laugh while his own life falls apart.
It is a tragic irony that the gun brought into a home to keep loved ones safe is far more likely to be their biggest threat.
But that tragic irony isn't going to deter Margo Price.
This is the tragic irony of the whole thing, how a party that prides itself on being peacemakers around the world, how are they going to be taken seriously the next time they are in charge, when they try to approach two sparring peoples, such as the Shiites and the Sunnis, to persuade them to bury the hatchet?
What a tragic irony in that name, it would turn out; when the policemen arrived, the barangay tanod were said to be already firing at a van with seven people onboard.
It would be a tragic irony if the process of divorcing the UK from the EU resulted in a surge in sectarian tensions in Ireland and economic hardship for families throughout the British Isles.
There's a tragic irony in the fact that a film capturing the spirit of Cairo can't be shown to the people living in it.
For example, such a bill could create a schism in the combined fight against terrorism which would be a sad but tangible and tragic irony.
The tragic irony Takal exposes here is that society all too often asks women to be both of these characters simultaneously.
Chief executive Michael Gidney said: "It is a tragic irony that so many people we rely on three times a day, from breakfast to dinner, should be going hungry themselves.
Thus, a tragic irony of Market Garden's failure and attempts to reduce collateral civilian casualties, was the Hongerwinter (Hunger Winter) of 1944-45 in which 25,000 Dutch citizens starved to death.
The tragic irony was that the more they avoided facing suffering and death, the less they could believe in the resurrection and the transformation of hope that it holds out.