tragicomedy


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trag·i·com·e·dy

 (trăj′ĭ-kŏm′ĭ-dē)
n. pl. trag·i·com·e·dies
1. A work of fiction, as a play, film, or novel, combining elements of tragedy and comedy.
2. The genre made up of such works.
3. An incident or situation having both comic and tragic elements.

[French tragicomédie, from Italian tragicommedia, from Late Latin tragicōmoedia, short for Latin tragicocōmoedia : tragicus, tragic; see tragic + cōmoedia, comedy; see comedy.]

trag′i·com′ic (-kŏm′ĭk), trag′i·com′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
trag′i·com′i·cal·ly adv.

tragicomedy

(ˌtrædʒɪˈkɒmɪdɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Theatre)
a. a drama in which aspects of both tragedy and comedy are found
b. the dramatic genre of works of this kind
2. an event or incident having both comic and tragic aspects
[C16: from French, ultimately from Late Latin tragicōmoedia; see tragedy, comedy]
ˌtragiˈcomic, ˌtragiˈcomical adj
ˌtragiˈcomically adv

trag•i•com•e•dy

(ˌtrædʒ ɪˈkɒm ɪ di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a dramatic or other literary composition combining elements of both tragedy and comedy.
2. an incident, or series of incidents, of mixed tragic and comic character.
[1570–80; < Late Latin tragicōmoedia, syncopated variant of Latin tragicocōmoedia. See tragic, -o-, comedy]
trag`i•com′ic (-ˈkɒm ɪk) trag`i•com′i•cal, adj.
trag`i•com′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tragicomedy - a dramatic composition involving elements of both tragedy and comedy usually with the tragic predominatingtragicomedy - a dramatic composition involving elements of both tragedy and comedy usually with the tragic predominating
tragedy - drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or circumstance; excites terror or pity
2.tragicomedy - a comedy with serious elements or overtonestragicomedy - a comedy with serious elements or overtones
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Translations
tragicomédie

tragicomedy

[ˈtrædʒɪˈkɒmɪdɪ] Ntragicomedia f

tragicomedy

tragicomedy

[ˌtrædʒɪˈkɒmɪdɪ] ntragicommedia
References in classic literature ?
The concealment, innocent as it seems, was the first step in the second tragicomedy of John's existence.
Powell, whom the chance of his name had thrown upon the floating stage of that tragicomedy would have been perfectly useless for my purpose if the unusual of an obvious kind had not aroused his attention from the first.
Measure for Measure is nevertheless among those Shakespeare plays to which the term tragicomedy is occasionally applied.
Humor and satire can depend on bad news when this quirky tragicomedy looks into family care-taking, family hoarding, AA, OCD, ADHD, psoriasis, random impulse buying, popular writing disorders and other pandemic maladies of the day.
1) While their tragicomedies were remarkably popular with audiences and influential on other playwrights throughout the seventeenth century, the burgeoning genre of tragicomedy was also maligned as an aesthetically impure form of drama for its mingling of comedy and tragedy, seemingly against the decorum of neoclassical poetics.
But since premiering last month, "Saul'' has emerged not only as TV's most beguiling tragicomedy, but also a favorite hunting ground for high-alert Easter eggheads.
Sidney Lumet's abrasive time capsule tragicomedy is based on the bizarre true story of a bungled Brooklyn bank robbery.
Good Bye, Lenin", a 2003 German tragicomedy film, was also shown, in the presence of the German Embassy staff, cultural savvies and cinema fans.
In this five-hour stand-up tragicomedy, abstract "jokes" took the form of poems, dances, and even philosophical fables.
35pm This observational tragicomedy, directed by Mike Leigh, follows the fortunes of a working-class North London family over a few weeks in the summer.
A true classic tragicomedy regaling the 18th century experiences of Doctor Primrose and his family, "The Vicar Of Wakefield" is now available as an unabridged audio book that is expertly narrated by professional stage actor Nicholas Farrell.
It is an absorbing Chekhovian tragicomedy about two generations of a family originally from the Punjab but based in Britain since the late 1960s.