trainload


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train·load

 (trān′lōd′)
n.
The number of occupants or the amount of material that a passenger or freight train can hold.

trainload

(ˈtreɪnˌləʊd)
n
the quantity of people or cargo sufficient to fill a train
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trainload - quantity that can be carried by a traintrainload - quantity that can be carried by a train
load, loading - a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time; "the system broke down under excessive loads"
References in classic literature ?
And meantime trainloads of supplies were coming in for their accommodation, including beer and whisky, so that they might not be tempted to go outside.
Lawyer Manuelito Luna, in a recent media advisory, said that from a truckload, the complainants now have 'a trainload of proof to pin (Morales) down.
A trade paper advert for the movie proclaimed: "Buster drives 'The General' to trainload of laughter" and Keaton himself once said: "Railroads are a great prop.
At one time, Andrus order the Idaho State Police to block a trainload of waste headed to the site near Arco.
It's not just about moving a trainload [of materials].
Many were nervous after Hungary tried to transport a trainload of migrants heading for Austria into a camp on Thursday.
The Rajasthan Congress is planning to bring a trainload of supporters in Kisan Express for the rally, which is being organised to protest the controversial Land Acquisition Ordinance of the BJP- led NDA government.
Companies are now pumping in as much as a trainload of frac sand into a single well to coax more oil and gas from shale rocks.
In the old days, you could call up [BNSF] and say, 'Hey, I need another shipment, another trainload of coal.
With deregulation and an almost total lack of public investment in rail infrastructure and service, we have been asking the railways to operate efficiently against competitors that are still receiving a trainload of hidden subsidies.
The 2013 warrant accused Breyer of 158 counts of accessory to murder -- one count for each trainload of victims brought to the Auschwitz death camp in occupied Poland from May to October 1944, when he was allegedly a guard there.