tramper


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tramp

 (trămp)
v. tramped, tramp·ing, tramps
v.intr.
1. To walk with a firm, heavy step; trudge.
2.
a. To travel on foot; hike.
b. To wander about aimlessly.
v.tr.
1. To traverse on foot: tramp the fields.
2. To tread down; trample: tramp down snow.
n.
1.
a. A heavy footfall.
b. The sound produced by heavy walking or marching.
2. A walking trip; a hike.
3. One who travels aimlessly about on foot, doing odd jobs or begging for a living; a vagrant.
4.
a. A prostitute.
b. A person regarded as promiscuous.
5. Nautical A tramp steamer.
6. A metal plate attached to the sole of a shoe for protection, as when spading ground.

[Middle English trampen, to walk heavily, from Middle Low German.]

tramp′er n.
tramp′ish adj.
tramp′y adj.

tramper

(ˈtræmpə)
n
1. a person who tramps
2. NZ a person who walks long distances, often over rough terrain, for recreation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tramper - someone who walks with a heavy noisy gait or who stamps on the groundtramper - someone who walks with a heavy noisy gait or who stamps on the ground
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
2.tramper - a foot travelertramper - a foot traveler; someone who goes on an extended walk (for pleasure)
backpacker, packer - a hiker who wears a backpack
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
References in classic literature ?
In fact, no one can cope with him as a stark tramper of the wilderness.
Yer as good as there,' said the long-legged tramper, pointing out before him.
How the trampers might have behaved, had the young ladies been more courageous, must be doubtful; but such an invitation for attack could not be resisted; and Harriet was soon assailed by half a dozen children, headed by a stout woman and a great boy, all clamorous, and impertinent in look, though not absolutely in word.
One or two little houses, with the notice, 'Lodgings for Travellers', hanging out, had tempted me; but I was afraid of spending the few pence I had, and was even more afraid of the vicious looks of the trampers I had met or overtaken.
The trampers were worse than ever that day, and inspired me with a dread that is yet quite fresh in my mind.
Pickwick with a winning smile, 'but you was quite strangers to me; and we have such a many trampers that only come to see what they can lay their hands on, that really--'
As the travellers had observed that day many indications of their drawing nearer and nearer to the race town, such as gipsy camps, carts laden with gambling booths and their appurtenances, itinerant showmen of various kinds, and beggars and trampers of every degree, all wending their way in the same direction, Mr Codlin was fearful of finding the accommodations forestalled; this fear increasing as he diminished the distance between himself and the hostelry, he quickened his pace, and notwithstanding the burden he had to carry, maintained a round trot until he reached the threshold.