transcendentalism


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Related to transcendentalism: transcendental meditation, Ralph Waldo Emerson, romanticism

tran·scen·den·tal·ism

 (trăn′sĕn-dĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Transcendentalism A literary and philosophical movement arising in 19th-century New England, associated with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller and asserting the existence of an ideal spiritual reality that transcends empirical and scientific reality and is knowable through intuition.
2. The quality or state of being transcendental.

tran′scen·den′tal·ist n.

transcendentalism

(ˌtrænsɛnˈdɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy)
a. any system of philosophy, esp that of Kant, holding that the key to knowledge of the nature of reality lies in the critical examination of the processes of reason on which depends the nature of experience
b. any system of philosophy, esp that of Emerson, that emphasizes intuition as a means to knowledge or the importance of the search for the divine
2. (Philosophy) vague philosophical speculation
3. the state of being transcendental
4. something, such as thought or language, that is transcendental
ˌtranscenˈdentalist n, adj

tran•scen•den•tal•ism

(ˌtræn sɛnˈdɛn tlˌɪz əm, -sən-)

n.
1. transcendental character, thought, or language.
2. Also called transcenden′tal philos′ophy. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered by the study of the processes of thought, or a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical: in the U.S., associated with Emerson.
[1795–1805; < German Transcendentalismus. See transcendental, -ism]
tran`scen•den′tal•ist, n., adj.

transcendentalism

1. any philosophy based upon the doctrine that the principles of reality are to be discovered only through the analysis of the processes of thought, as Kantianism.
2. a philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical, as the philosophy of Emerson. Cf. descendentalism.transcendentalist, n.transcendentalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transcendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and materialtranscendentalism - any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
Translations

transcendentalism

[ˈtrænsenˈdentlɪzəm] Ntrascendentalismo m

transcendentalism

ntranszendentale Philosophie, Transzendentalismus m
References in classic literature ?
Transcendentalism is a beacon to the angels, even if it be a will-o'-the-wisp to man.
These fellows demonstrate a hidden meaning in "The Antediluvians," a parable in Powhatan," new views in "Cock Robin," and transcendentalism in "Hop O' My Thumb.
Dr Hirsch, though born in France and covered with the most triumphant favours of French education, was temperamentally of another type--mild, dreamy, humane; and, despite his sceptical system, not devoid of transcendentalism.
as in the Lysis, Charmides, Laches, to the transcendentalism of Plato, who, in the second stage of his philosophy, sought to find the nature of knowledge in a prior and future state of existence.
Blessed be nothing" and "The worse things are, the better they are" are proverbs which express the transcendentalism of common life.
Transcendentalism has its occasional vagaries (what school has not?
In Nature Emerson adopts this pattern of thinking, sans technicalities, to the point of humanizing nature while, at the same time, fusing a rough version of Kant's transcendental account of the knowing process with a metaphysical transcendentalism grounded in the being and "inexhaustible power" of God.
Indeed, few American writers have had so powerful a cultural influence or so enduring a critical reputation as this most elusive icon of American Transcendentalism.
Poe was probably not the first and certainly not the last to jeer at what he took to be another "mystic for mysticism's sake," and complaints about Emerson's obscurity have long contributed to the equation between transcendentalism and muddle-headed thinking.
These new books about Emerson's modernity represent two different directions for the contemporary study of Emerson, American Transcendentalism, and international romanticism.
Rand's judgments revealed and combined four criteria: first was his textualism, second his historicism, third his intellectualism, and fourth, his transcendentalism.
American Transcendentalism Web, 16 April 2010 <http://www.