transcendently


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tran·scen·dent

 (trăn-sĕn′dənt)
adj.
1. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme.
2. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception: "fails to achieve a transcendent significance in suffering and squalor" (National Review).
3. Philosophy
a. Transcending the Aristotelian categories.
b. In Kant's theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable.
4. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity.

tran·scen′dence, tran·scen′den·cy n.
tran·scen′dent·ly adv.
References in classic literature ?
A vision--a transcendently seductive vision of a Mexican girl arose before her.
If her countenance and hair had rather a floury appearance, as though from living in some transcendently genteel Mill, it was rather because she was a chalky creation altogether, than because she mended her complexion with violet powder, or had turned grey.
The inspiration-- I can call it by no other name--was that I felt how voluntarily, how transcendently, I MIGHT.
I find it, however, so transcendently stimulating and clarifying to the mind that its secondary action is a matter of small moment.
He was,' replied he, with the same calm gravity as before; 'but do not wrong me by supposing that I could continue my friendship and esteem to a man who could so infamously, so impiously forsake and injure one so transcendently - well, I won't speak of it.
For if we are correct in seeing the essence of Christian sacrifice as our participation, through the Spirit, in the transcendently free and self-giving love of the Father and the Son, and if Christian sacrifice is our inchoative, but already real, entering into the fullness of the totally free, self-giving, loving personal life of God, then it is obvious that the common understanding of "sacrifice" does not reveal, but rather effectively veils this reality.
For instance, in France, the age des lumieres developed an antireligious tendency with skeptical and materialistic backgrounds, as well as a hedonistic ethics with the goal of abolishing religion and morality insofar as they are founded transcendently.
Well, someone has finally put together a wonderbook of those imaginings: at long last, something wickedly gorgeous this way comes - Infinite Worlds: The Fantastic Visions of Science Fiction Art has faithfully, lovingly assembled the transcendently limpid deep-space tempera of the finely executed chimeras that have bedazzled the covers of science-fiction magazines, novels, and storybooks for over sixty years.
By reflecting upon our "self-awareness as rational agents," that is, upon the fact that our performative rationality and universal intent are transcendently operative in a variety of cognitional and practical undertakings, we shall be able to discover a deep and undeniably solid basis for relating the discoveries of science to theological investigation.
In nineteenth-century daguerreotypes of the American West, the land is the dropped rind from a transcendently fresh sky.
But suppose the laws of quantum physics did somehow precede the cosmos, hovering transcendently like Plato's eternal Forms.
Its language and plot turns are charming as hell, and its awed and irreverent takes on the classics -- Austen, yes, but also Jewish tradition more broadly -- make it absolutely geshmak -- or, if Ari isn't available to footnote that for you, transcendently delicious.