transgression


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trans·gres·sion

 (trăns-grĕsh′ən, trănz-)
n.
1. A violation of a law, principle, or duty. See Synonyms at breach.
2. The exceeding of due bounds or limits.
3. A relative rise in sea level resulting in deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata.

transgression

(trænzˈɡrɛʃən)
n
1. (Law) a breach of a law, etc; sin or crime
2. the act or an instance of transgressing

trans•gres•sion

(trænsˈgrɛʃ ən, trænz-)

n.
an act of transgressing; violation of a law, command, etc.; sin.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin trānsgressiō the act of going across, derivative of trānsgred(ī) (see transgress)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transgression - the act of transgressingtransgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
abomination - an action that is vicious or vile; an action that arouses disgust or abhorrence; "his treatment of the children is an abomination"
evil, wickedness, immorality, iniquity - morally objectionable behavior
villainy - a criminal or vicious act
turpitude, depravity - a corrupt or depraved or degenerate act or practice; "the various turpitudes of modern society"
vice - a specific form of evildoing; "vice offends the moral standards of the community"
sinning, sin - an act that is regarded by theologians as a transgression of God's will
terrorisation, terrorization - an act of terrorism
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
crime - an evil act not necessarily punishable by law; "crimes of the heart"
inside job - some transgression committed with the assistance of someone trusted by the victim; "the police decided that the crime was an inside job"
2.transgression - the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial stratatransgression - the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
3.transgression - the action of going beyond or overstepping some boundary or limit
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"

transgression

transgression

noun
An act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of nonfulfillment of an obligation or promise, for example:
Translations

transgression

[trænsˈgreʃən] Ntransgresión f, infracción f (Rel) → pecado m

transgression

[trænzˈgrɛʃən] ntransgression f

transgression

n
(of law)Verstoß m, → Verletzung f, → Überschreitung f
(= sin)Sünde f, → Verstoß m
References in classic literature ?
It would have been a much better transgression had I broken the bond of secrecy and told you every thing.
But fall'n he is, and now What rests, but that the mortal Sentence pass On his transgression, Death denounc't that day, Which he presumes already vain and void, Because not yet inflicted, as he fear'd, By some immediate stroak; but soon shall find Forbearance no acquittance ere day end.
I thank thee for thy good intentions, friend Sancho," answered Don Quixote, "but I would have thee know that all these things I am doing are not in joke, but very much in earnest, for anything else would be a transgression of the ordinances of chivalry, which forbid us to tell any lie whatever under the penalties due to apostasy; and to do one thing instead of another is just the same as lying; so my knocks on the head must be real, solid, and valid, without anything sophisticated or fanciful about them, and it will be needful to leave me some lint to dress my wounds, since fortune has compelled us to do without the balsam we lost.
But either his success, or the frequency of the transgression in others, soon wiped off this slight stain from his character; and, although there were a few who, dissatisfied with their own fortunes, or conscious of their own demerits, would make dark hints concerning the sudden prosperity of the unportioned Quaker, yet his services, and possibly his wealth, soon drove the recollection of these vague conjectures from men’s minds.
If anybody says anything, I shall say that I'm looking at the river," she thought, for in her slavery to her family traditions, she was ready to pay for her transgression with some plausible falsehood.
More than the idea I never felt, for, happily, I never committed a fault that was deemed worthy of such penalty; but once I remember, for some transgression of my sister's, our mother thought proper to inflict it upon her: what SHE felt, I cannot tell; but my sympathetic tears and suffering for her sake I shall not soon forget.
His primacy was savage, and savagely he ruled, administering justice with a club, punishing transgression with the pain of a blow, and rewarding merit, not by kindness, but by withholding a blow.
It's a transgression all the same and has got to be paid for in the usual way.
Now I would have both so to benefit by the experience of others, and the precepts of a higher authority, that they should know beforehand to refuse the evil and choose the good, and require no experimental proofs to teach them the evil of transgression.
Blessed am I beyond women even herein, That beyond all born women is my sin, And perfect my transgression.
The Puritan --if not belied by some singular stories, murmured, even at this day, under the narrator's breath--had fallen into certain transgressions to which men of his great animal development, whatever their faith or principles, must continue liable, until they put off impurity, along with the gross earthly substance that involves it.
The old clergyman, nurtured at the rich bosom of the English Church, had a long established and legitimate taste for all good and comfortable things, and however stern he might show himself in the pulpit, or in his public reproof of such transgressions as that of Hester Prynne, still, the genial benevolence of his private life had won him warmer affection than was accorded to any of his professional contemporaries.