transience


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tran·si·ence

 (trăn′zē-əns, zhəns, -shəns) also tran·si·en·cy (-zē-ən-sē, -zhən-, -shən-)
n.
The state or quality of being transient.

transience, transiency

the state or quality of passing with time or being ephemeral or fleeting. — transient, adj.
See also: Time

Transience

 

See Also: BREVITY, DEATH, LIFE

  1. About as fixed as liquid mercury —Leslie Bennetts, New York Times, June 8, 1986
  2. The brilliant passes like the dew at dawn —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    In Faust, from which this is taken, Goethe continues by presenting the other side of the coin: “The true endures for ages yet unborn.”

  3. Burnt like a faggot in a tempest —Willa Cather
  4. Changed them like underwear —Paige Mitchell

    In Mitchell’s novel, The Covenant, law clerks are what are being so changed.

  5. (His smile) comes and goes as quickly as snow —Robert Goldberg about film maker Alain Renais, Wall Street Journal, March 24, 1987

    See Also: ENTRANCES/EXITS

  6. Disposable as extra income —Anon
  7. Disposable as razor blades —Anon
  8. Disposable as TV dinner containers —Anon
  9. Enduring as a summer shower —Anon
  10. Ephemeral as butterflies —Susan Heller Anderson on literary magazines, New York TimesColumn One, October 24, 1986
  11. Ephemeral things, like movement, are manifestations of immortality —Joanne Selzer

    This is the closing line for a poem entitled Prima Ballerina.

  12. Flare briefly like the candles upon a cake —Donald Justice
  13. (Embrace … ) fleeting as a bird’s poise —Edith Wharton
  14. Fleeting as a dream of night lost in the garish day —Aeschylus
  15. Fleeting as a raspberry season —Line from television drama, “St. Elsewhere,” broadcast December 16, 1986
  16. Fleeting as the estate of man —Marcus Aurelius
  17. A fleeting gratification … like alms thrown to the beggar, that keeps him alive today that his misery may be prolonged till the morrow —Lynne Sharon Schwartz
  18. How fading are the joys we dote upon! Like apparitions seen and gone —John Norris
  19. Like a rainbow, spectacular but short-lived —Anon

    A variation: “Like a shooting star —spectacular but shortlived.”

  20. Like water thrown on the sand: it [media campaign about energy crisis] left little trace —George F. Will
  21. Mortality weights heavily on me like unwilling sleep —John Keats
  22. (The moment of agitation) passed (from his gaze) like a cloud, leaving a clear blue sky —Christopher Isherwood
  23. Passing through a certain stage, something rather like an illness —Thomas Mann
  24. Permanent as a temporary price increase —Anon
  25. Temporary as an idea in an empty head —Anon
  26. Temporary as a wave —Anon
  27. (Beauty is as) temporary as flowers —Anon
  28. Transience (His self-possession was) temporary, like a reflection in water that may be wiped out at the first swell —Saul Bellow
  29. (His love was as) transient as the first golden streaks of dawn —Harry Prince
  30. Transitory as childhood —Lawrence Durrell
  31. Will last about as long as a snowball in hell —Anon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Transience - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dyingtransience - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
fugaciousness, fugacity - the lack of enduring qualities (used chiefly of plant parts)
ephemerality, ephemeralness, fleetingness - the property of lasting for a very short time
2.Transience - the attribute of being brief or fleetingtransience - the attribute of being brief or fleeting
length, duration - continuance in time; "the ceremony was of short duration"; "he complained about the length of time required"

transience

Translations

transience

[ˈtrænzɪəns] Nlo pasajero, transitoriedad f

transience

[ˈtrænziəns] n (formal)caractère m transitoire

transience

n (of life)Kürze f, → Vergänglichkeit f; (of grief, joy)Kurzlebigkeit f, → Vergänglichkeit f; (of interest)Kurzlebigkeit f, → Flüchtigkeit f

transience

[ˈtrænzɪəns] n (frm) → transitorietà
References in classic literature ?
I began to perceive more deeply than it has ever yet been stated, the trembling immateriality, the mistlike transience, of this seemingly so solid body in which we walk attired.
For the curator Diethard Leopold the exhibition is a dialogue focused on graphic works and dominated by "sensuality, loneliness, desire, longing, love, hopelessness and transience.
Butterflies flick over the maze but the daffodils are now dying reminding me of the transience of Nature.
Exploring Atlantic Transitions: Archaeologies of Transience and Permanence in New Found Lands, edited by Peter E.
She's especially drawn by the "fleeting and fragile nature of flowers" and their symbolic relationship to human transience.
Reconstruction own rail tracks, thus the superstructure and substructure, reconstruction of platforms affected stations and stops, modernization of railway signaling equipment, setting up the remote control signaling equipment (DOZ), security and reconstruction of level crossings, ensuring the capacity of bridges and culverts required for transience, space patency.
But transience becomes permanence in Lifeboat, 1985, where an inflatable dinghy is turned to bronze: A symbol of safety becomes an image of "sunk.
com)-- "One is ever conscious of the transience of all things, and of nature's smiling indifference, also that art is but imitation of nature.
Two death sentences, though in two different regions and under different circumstances, have nevertheless provided a sobering spectacle this week, making one aware of the transience of human life, ambition and power.
Andersen explores the implications of global transience for organizations and organizing, focusing on the relationship between organization and employee.
Later, he read a poem by Turkish bard Yunus Emre on the transience of kings and stately power.
2) What risk factors (for example, transience, mental illness, addiction) predict technology use?