transiency


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tran·si·ence

 (trăn′zē-əns, zhəns, -shəns) also tran·si·en·cy (-zē-ən-sē, -zhən-, -shən-)
n.
The state or quality of being transient.

transience, transiency

the state or quality of passing with time or being ephemeral or fleeting. — transient, adj.
See also: Time
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transiency - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dyingtransiency - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
fugaciousness, fugacity - the lack of enduring qualities (used chiefly of plant parts)
ephemerality, ephemeralness, fleetingness - the property of lasting for a very short time
References in periodicals archive ?
10] In any society, poor people bear most of the brunt of violence, which is associated with 'over-crowding, family disruption, weak social structures, high population concentrations, population transiency and social norms which encourage the use of violence to cope with difficulties'.
The article goes on to say, a more flexible job environment actually creates more jobs, though job sharing, project based jobs, as well as can accommodate population transiency.
That process initially takes shape in Sylvie's commitment to transiency, which quietly traces a debt to America's peripatetic grand narratives, from Moby-Dick (1850) and Thoreau's Walden (1854) to Whitman's "Song of the Open Road" (1856) and Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885); from Hemingway's In Our Time (1925) to Nabokov's Lolita (1955/58) and Kerouac's On the Road (1957).
These people don't want to be tied down to a mortgage, and so they've turned to rented property to fulfil their need for transiency - and this has driven the returns that investors in rented real estate have enjoyed.
There is a lot of transiency with students moving from one school to another, so one way that we've tried to invest in our families and in our students is to make sure that they are very happy and that they are pleased with the success they are seeing, so that they return for the next school year.
These people don't want to be tied down to a mortgage, and so they've turned to rented property to fulfil their need for transiency -- and this has driven the returns that investors in rented real estate have enjoyed.
Lastly, given that (a) melanoma incidence is characterized by a significant latency period, (b) the study period comprised 36 years, and (c) county population transiency may effect the interpretation of results, the researchers collected migration data for the counties under investigation (Table 2).
In addition to this fragmentation, the presence of elderly housing units in the district, the transiency of the minority populations and their historically low voter turnout rates severely weaken their majority status.
The challenges of student transiency for rural schools and communities in the era of No Child Left Behind.
They found that it was difficult to find consistent census data on the number of refugees living in Ontario because of the high transiency rate.
Suffering of any kind is subversive to the house of ego, calling into question the mental or physical basis of the conception of self, highlighting its transiency and mutability.
The prevalence of migration and the transiency of the population in this period make it difficult to determine how many Catholics actually resided in either place in 1829.