transient


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to transient: transient global amnesia, transient ischemic attack

tran·si·ent

 (trăn′zē-ənt, -zhənt, -shənt)
adj.
1. Passing with time; transitory: "the transient beauty of youth" (Lydia M. Child).
2. Remaining in a place only a brief time: transient laborers.
3. Physics Decaying with time, especially as a simple exponential function of time.
n.
1. One that is transient, especially a hotel guest or boarder who stays for only a brief time.
2. Physics A transient phenomenon or property, especially a transient electric current.

[Alteration of Latin trānsiēns, trānseunt-, present participle of trānsīre, to go over : trāns-, over; see trans- + īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

tran′si·ent·ly adv.

transient

(ˈtrænzɪənt)
adj
1. for a short time only; temporary or transitory
2. (Philosophy) philosophy a variant of transeunt
n
3. a transient person or thing
4. (General Physics) physics a brief change in the state of a system, such as a sudden short-lived oscillation in the current flowing through a circuit
[C17: from Latin transiēns going over, from transīre to pass over, from trans- + īre to go]
ˈtransiently adv
ˈtransience, ˈtransiency n

tran•sient

(ˈtræn ʃənt, -ʒənt, -zi ənt)

adj.
1. not lasting, enduring, or permanent; transitory.
2. lasting only a short time; existing briefly; temporary: transient authority.
3. staying only a short time: transient guests at a hotel.
n.
4. a person or thing that is transient, esp. a temporary guest, boarder, or laborer.
5. Physics.
a. a nonperiodic signal of short duration.
b. a decaying signal, wave, or oscillation.
6. a sudden pulse of voltage or current.
[1590–1600; < Latin transi(ēns), present participle of transīre to cross, pass (see transit) + -ent]
tran′science, tran′scien•cy, n.
tran′sient•ly, adv.
syn: See temporary.

transient

1. Personnel, ships, or craft stopping temporarily at a post, station, or port to which they are not assigned or attached, and having destination elsewhere.
2. An independent merchant ship calling at a port and sailing within 12 hours, and for which routing instructions to a further port have been promulgated.
3. An individual awaiting orders, transport, etc., at a post or station to which he or she is not attached or assigned.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transient - one who stays for only a short timetransient - one who stays for only a short time; "transient laborers"
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
2.transient - (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or loadtransient - (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or load
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
oscillation, vibration - (physics) a regular periodic variation in value about a mean
Adj.1.transient - of a mental acttransient - of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
2.transient - lasting a very short time; "the ephemeral joys of childhood"; "a passing fancy"; "youth's transient beauty"; "love is transitory but it is eternal"; "fugacious blossoms"
impermanent, temporary - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"

transient

transient

adjective
Translations
transienttransitorisch

transient

[ˈtrænzɪənt]
A. ADJtransitorio, pasajero
B. N (US) → transeúnte mf

transient

[ˈtrænziənt] adj [feeling, pain] → passager/ère; [relationship, quality, nature] → éphémère
the transient nature of fashion
(SCIENCE) [state, behaviour] → transitoire

transient

adj
lifekurz; grief, joy, pleasurekurzlebig, vergänglich, vorübergehend; interestkurzlebig, flüchtig, vorübergehend; the transient nature of somethingdie Kurzlebigkeit von etw
(US) transient populationnichtansässiger or nicht ansässiger Teil der Bevölkerung eines Ortes
n (US) → Durchreisende(r) mf

transient

[ˈtrænzɪənt] adjtransitorio/a, fugace

transient

adj transitorio, pasajero
References in classic literature ?
One evening in July, when the transient guests who made the New Willard House their temporary home had become scarce, and the hallways, lighted only by kerosene lamps turned low, were plunged in gloom, Elizabeth Willard had an adventure.
they must have understood from the beginning that she and her sister had never looked upon them except as transient hosts and chance acquaintances.
One reason perhaps is, that not one in fifty of the actual disasters and deaths by casualties in the fishery, ever finds a public record at home, however transient and immediately forgotten that record.
It may have been a flash of honesty in him; or mere prudential policy which, under the circumstance, imperiously forbade the slightest symptom of open disaffection, however transient, in the important chief officer of his ship.
Of these there was an army, the huge surplus labor army of society; called into being under the stern system of nature, to do the casual work of the world, the tasks which were transient and irregular, and yet which had to be done.
For my part, I feel that with regard to Nature I live a sort of border life, on the confines of a world into which I make occasional and transient forays only, and my patriotism and allegiance to the state into whose territories I seem to retreat are those of a moss-trooper.
In the seminary building there was an excitement so deep and profound that it expressed itself in a kind of hushed silence, a transient suspension of life, as those most interested approached the crucial moment.
Bessie asked if I would have a book: the word BOOK acted as a transient stimulus, and I begged her to fetch Gulliver's Travels from the library.
Catherine and Isabella were sitting in the library, on hostile terms, but silent: the latter alarmed at her recent indiscretion, and the disclosure she had made of her secret feelings in a transient fit of passion; the former, on mature consideration, really offended with her companion; and, if she laughed again at her pertness, inclined to make it no laughing matter to her.
The transient color faded from her face, as she spread the little manuscript open on her lap.
I can recollect, indeed, to have speculated, at odd times, on the possibility of my not being taught any more, or cared for any more; and growing up to be a shabby, moody man, lounging an idle life away, about the village; as well as on the feasibility of my getting rid of this picture by going away somewhere, like the hero in a story, to seek my fortune: but these were transient visions, daydreams I sat looking at sometimes, as if they were faintly painted or written on the wall of my room, and which, as they melted away, left the wall blank again.
Thus it came to pass that his movement of pity towards Sally Oates, which had given him a transient sense of brotherhood, heightened the repulsion between him and his neighbours, and made his isolation more complete.