transpadane


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transpadane

(ˈtrænzpəˌdeɪn; trænsˈpeɪdeɪn)
adj
(Historical Terms) (prenominal) on or from the far (or north) side of the River Po, as viewed from Rome. Compare cispadane
[C17: from Latin Transpadānus, from trans- + Padus the River Po]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here, however, there is clear evidence of traducers of the Flavian gens in operation: those who alleged a Transpadane origo were suggesting at the least that the family was not from Italy and probably that the great-grandfather was not even born a Roman citizen.
10) This would seem a reasonable assumption given the presumable date of his birth and the enfranchisement of the Transpadanes by Caesar only in 49 BC.
46) Whereas in the dedication poem Catullus addressed a fellow Transpadane in whom the poet detected literary respect for himself (unrelated to any explicit formal demands), in Poem 65, to the degree that one is distracted by the elevated status of the addressee, even the least cynical of readers must at least ponder the more self-serving purposes potentially underlying a poet's resort in such circumstances to the rhetoric of the carmen iussum.
And, even if he does, will he appreciate the problematic correspondences between the flesh-and-bone Transpadane and his Cyrenian model mapped out in the compositional relationship obtaining between 65 and 66?
All of the Roman world, even the small village of Andes in quiet, rustic Transpadane Gaul, was plunged into political chaos.
59) Various of Fronto's correspondents in Italy were fellow-Africans: besides Julius Celsinus and Arrius Antoninus, then governor of Transpadane Gaul, (60) perhaps also Claudius Julianus (Ad.