transpire


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tran·spire

 (trăn-spīr′)
v. tran·spired, tran·spir·ing, tran·spires
v.intr.
1. To come about; happen or occur.
2. To become known; come to light.
3. To give off vapor containing waste products, as through animal or plant pores.
v.tr.
To give off (vapor containing waste products) through the pores of the skin or the stomata of plant tissue.

[French transpirer, from Medieval Latin trānspīrāre : Latin trāns-, trans- + Latin spīrāre, to breathe.]
Usage Note: Transpire has been used since the mid-1700s in the sense "to become publicly known," as in Despite efforts to hush the matter up, it soon transpired that the colonels had met with the rebel leaders. While this usage has been considered standard for generations, it appears to be on shaky ground and could be headed for obsolescence. In our 2001 survey, 48 percent of the Usage Panel rejected it in the sentence quoted above. It might be better to use a synonym such as become known, leak out, or get around. · The more common use of transpire meaning "to happen or occur" has a more troubled history. Though it dates at least to the beginning of the 1800s, language critics have condemned it for more than one hundred years as both pretentious and unconnected to the word's original meaning, "to give off as vapor." But there is considerable evidence that resistance to this sense of transpire is weakening. In our 1966 survey, only 38 percent of the Usage Panel found it acceptable; in 1988, 58 percent accepted it in the sentence All of these events transpired after last week's announcement. In 2001, 66 percent accepted the same sentence. Nonetheless, many of the Panelists who accepted the usage also remarked that it was pretentious or pompous. This usage is easily avoided by saying happen, occur, or take place instead.

transpire

(trænˈspaɪə)
vb
1. (intr) to come to light; be known
2. (intr) informal to happen or occur
3. (Physiology) physiol to give off or exhale (water or vapour) through the skin, a mucous membrane, etc
4. (Botany) (of plants) to lose (water in the form of water vapour), esp through the stomata of the leaves
[C16: from Medieval Latin transpīrāre, from Latin trans- + spīrāre to breathe]
tranˈspirable adj
transpiration n
tranˈspiratory, ˌtranspiˈrational adj
Usage: It is often maintained that transpire should not be used to mean happen or occur, as in the event transpired late in the evening, and that the word is properly used to mean become known, as in it transpired later that the thief had been caught. The word is, however, widely used in the former sense, esp in spoken English

tran•spire

(trænˈspaɪər)

v. -spired, -spir•ing. v.i.
1. to occur; happen; take place.
2. to emit or give off waste matter, watery vapor, etc., through the surface, as of leaves or the body.
3. to escape, as moisture or odor, through or as if through pores.
4. to be revealed or become known.
v.t.
5. to emit or give off (watery vapor, an odor, etc.) through the surface.
[1590–1600; < Middle French transpirer < Medieval Latin trānspīrāre= Latin trāns- trans- + spīrāre to breathe]
tran•spir′a•ble, adj.
tran•spir′a•to`ry (-ˈspaɪr əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
usage: From its earlier literal sense “to escape as vapor” transpire came to mean “to escape from concealment, become known” in the 18th century. Somewhat later, it developed the meaning “to occur, happen,” a sentence such as He was not aware of what had transpired yesterday being taken to mean He was not aware of what had happened yesterday. In spite of two centuries of use in all varieties of speech and writing, this now common meaning is still criticized by some on the grounds that it arose from a misapprehension of the word's original meaning.

transpire

- Had an early sense of "emit as vapor through the surface"—from trans-, "through," and spirare, "breathe."
See also related terms for vapor.

transpire


Past participle: transpired
Gerund: transpiring

Imperative
transpire
transpire
Present
I transpire
you transpire
he/she/it transpires
we transpire
you transpire
they transpire
Preterite
I transpired
you transpired
he/she/it transpired
we transpired
you transpired
they transpired
Present Continuous
I am transpiring
you are transpiring
he/she/it is transpiring
we are transpiring
you are transpiring
they are transpiring
Present Perfect
I have transpired
you have transpired
he/she/it has transpired
we have transpired
you have transpired
they have transpired
Past Continuous
I was transpiring
you were transpiring
he/she/it was transpiring
we were transpiring
you were transpiring
they were transpiring
Past Perfect
I had transpired
you had transpired
he/she/it had transpired
we had transpired
you had transpired
they had transpired
Future
I will transpire
you will transpire
he/she/it will transpire
we will transpire
you will transpire
they will transpire
Future Perfect
I will have transpired
you will have transpired
he/she/it will have transpired
we will have transpired
you will have transpired
they will have transpired
Future Continuous
I will be transpiring
you will be transpiring
he/she/it will be transpiring
we will be transpiring
you will be transpiring
they will be transpiring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been transpiring
you have been transpiring
he/she/it has been transpiring
we have been transpiring
you have been transpiring
they have been transpiring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been transpiring
you will have been transpiring
he/she/it will have been transpiring
we will have been transpiring
you will have been transpiring
they will have been transpiring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been transpiring
you had been transpiring
he/she/it had been transpiring
we had been transpiring
you had been transpiring
they had been transpiring
Conditional
I would transpire
you would transpire
he/she/it would transpire
we would transpire
you would transpire
they would transpire
Past Conditional
I would have transpired
you would have transpired
he/she/it would have transpired
we would have transpired
you would have transpired
they would have transpired
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.transpire - pass through the tissue or substance or its pores or interstices, as of gas
flow, flux - move or progress freely as if in a stream; "The crowd flowed out of the stadium"
2.transpire - exude water vaportranspire - exude water vapor; "plants transpire"
evaporate, vaporize, vaporise - lose or cause to lose liquid by vaporization leaving a more concentrated residue; "evaporate milk"
3.transpire - come to light; become known; "It transpired that she had worked as spy in East Germany"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
4.transpire - come about, happen, or occurtranspire - come about, happen, or occur; "Several important events transpired last week"
hap, happen, occur, come about, take place, go on, pass off, fall out, pass - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"
5.transpire - give off (water) through the skintranspire - give off (water) through the skin  
exudate, exude, ooze out, transude, ooze - release (a liquid) in drops or small quantities; "exude sweat through the pores"

transpire

verb
1. become known, emerge, come out, be discovered, come to light, be disclosed, be made public It transpired that he had left his driving licence at home.
2. happen, occur, take place, arise, turn up, come about, come to pass (archaic) Nothing is known about what transpired at the meeting.
Usage: It is sometimes maintained that transpire should not be used to mean `happen' or `occur', as in the event transpired late in the evening, and that the word is properly used to mean `become known', as in it transpired later that the thief had been caught. The word is, however, widely used in the first sense, especially in spoken English.

transpire

verb
1. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
3. To flow or leak out or emit something slowly:
Translations

transpire

[trænsˈpaɪəʳ]
A. VI
1. (Bot, Anat) → transpirar
2. (= become known) it finally transpired thatal final se supo que ...
3. (= happen) → ocurrir, suceder
his report on what transpiredsu informe acerca de lo que pasó
B. VTtranspirar

transpire

[trænˈspaɪər] vi
(= become known) → se révéler
This, it transpired, was true → Cela s'est révélé vrai.
it finally transpired that ... → il s'est finalement révélé que ...
(= happen) → ressortir
Nobody knows what transpired at the meeting → Personne ne sait ce qui est ressorti de la réunion.

transpire

vi
(= become clear)sich herausstellen; (slowly) → durchsickern
(= happen)passieren (inf)
(Anat) → schwitzen, transpirieren (geh); (Bot) → Feuchtigkeit abgeben or verdunsten, transpirieren (spec)
vt (Bot) moistureverdunsten, abgeben

transpire

[trænsˈpaɪəʳ] vi
a. (Bot, Physiology) → traspirare
b. (frm) (become known) it finally transpired that ...alla fine si è venuto a sapere che...
c. (incorrect use, happen) → succedere

tran·spire

v. transpirar; [to perspire] sudar, transpirar; [to happen] suceder, acontecer.
References in classic literature ?
So that, through their zeal for him, they had all conspired, so far as in them lay, to muffle up the knowledge of this thing from others; and hence it was, that not till a considerable interval had elapsed, did it transpire upon the Pequod's decks.
They never could agree all together; there were so many arguments upon each side, and one would be obstinate, and no sooner would the rest have convinced him than it would transpire that his arguments had caused another to waver.
Since the receipt of the last, I’ “—here a long passage was rendered indistinct by a kind of humming noise by the sheriff—” ‘I grieve to say that ‘—hum, hum, bad enough to be sure—’ but trusts that a merciful Providence has seen fit’—hum, hum, hum seems to be a good, pious sort of a man, ‘Duke; belongs to the Established Church, I dare say; hum, hum—’ vessel sailed from Falmouth on or about the 1st September of last year, and’—hum, hum, hum, ‘If anything should transpire on this afflicting subject shall not fail’— hum, hum; really a good-hearted man, for a lawyer—’but Can communicate nothing further at present’—hum, hum.
During the last two weeks I had looked for much to transpire, but am still ignorant whether at that time anything decisive ever passed between Mademoiselle and the General.
So prepared, whatever was the impression received from the letter, no reflection of that impression was allowed to transpire upon his countenance.
Such bijou ne plus ultras, replete with all the amenities, do not, as I pointed out to Penfentenyou, transpire outside of England.
It was a hard bargain, but one that Wade could afford to take up, for if the wheat were to freeze out, or if the grasshoppers should eat it, or the chinch bugs ruin it, or a hail storm beat it down into the mud, or if any of the many hatreds Stepmother Nature holds out toward those trusting souls who would squeeze a living from her hard hands--if any of these misfortunes should transpire, he would be out nothing but labor, and that was the one thing he and Martin could afford to risk.
It is not politic that I remain to witness what shall transpire.
She did not learn either to forget or defend the past; but she learned to hope that it would never transpire farther, and that it might not cost her Henry's entire regard.
There we may live for a time, and who knows what may transpire to aid us to escape?
No, D'Artagnan," replied Athos, promptly; "but because the king is not willing that the secret of his family should transpire among the people, and cover with shame the executioners of the son of Louis XIII.