transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

tran·sub·stan·ti·a·tion

 (trăn′səb-stăn′shē-ā′shən)
n.
1. Conversion of one substance into another.
2. In many Christian churches, the doctrine holding that the bread and wine of the Eucharist are transformed into the body and blood of Jesus, although their appearances remain the same.

tran′sub·stan′ti·a′tion·al·ist n.

transubstantiation

(ˌtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) (esp in Roman Catholic theology)
a. the doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
b. the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration. Compare consubstantiation
2. a substantial change; transmutation
ˌtransubˌstantiˈationalist n

tran•sub•stan•ti•a•tion

(ˌtræn səbˌstæn ʃiˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the changing of one substance into another.
2. (in the Eucharist) the conversion of the whole substance of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, only the appearance of bread and wine remaining.

transubstantiation

the doctrine that the consecrated elements of the communion only appear as bread and wine, for they have been converted into the whole substance of the body and blood of Christ. Cf. consubstantiation, receptionism, virtualism. — transubstantiationalist, n.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharisttransubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
2.transubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of somethingtransubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
conversion - the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another

transubstantiation

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
eðlisbreytingeðlisbreytingarkenningingjörbreytingmyndbreytingummyndun

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən] Ntransubstanciación f

transubstantiation

n (Rel) → Wandlung f, → Transsubstantiation f (spec)

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃn] n (Rel) → transustanziazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
presents readers with a veritable confrontation between Lonergan and Chauvet on the proper understanding of the relationship between metaphysics and sacramental theology, and, more narrowly, transubstantiation.
A marble sarcophagus agape like deaths toothless gums is certainly an image to "make night hideous"; the syntagm has become an emblem of Arany's idiosyncratic transubstantiation of Shakespeare's imagery.
28, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- DNA analysis of consecrated, sacramental bread conducted by two Raelian scientists refutes the Catholic claim of transubstantiation, according to a publication* of the Association of Raelian Scientists.
Critics of the centuries-long ex-communication policy point out that Catholics who have repented from what is considered bigger sins such as murder or being part of organised criminal groups are allowed to receive the host, believed by Catholics to be the body of Christ through the process of transubstantiation.
By devising a technological transubstantiation of the city's terrestrial pathways, he has produced an analogous redistribution of perceptions of collective energy.
The first was that of the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, the second that of the Lutheran Real Presence, and the third that of a spiritual presence derived from a gift of the Holy Spirit.
Boas stated in The Cambridge History of English Literature (1918) "beneath its apparently jocular exterior, it veils an extraordinarily dextrous attack upon the doctrine of transubstantiation and the persecution by which it was enforced.
The laws in effect when James II came to the throne excluded from public office anyone who refused to take the sacrament in the Church of England, and required all officeholders to renounce the doctrine of transubstantiation.
Quebecers call themselves Catholics even as they reject essential elements of dogma such as the resurrection of Christ, the immortality of the soul, original sin, and transubstantiation.
Similarly, why didn't they find a means of incorporating transubstantiation into the creeds, which are supposed to be the statement of our beliefs?
The difference is, however, that transubstantiation would still occur whether or not there were an audience.
Nevertheless, the text was not about historical linguistics, it pursued a religious objective: prove the effective existence of an ancient faith and practice of the Church of England, especially concerning transubstantiation.