transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

tran·sub·stan·ti·a·tion

 (trăn′səb-stăn′shē-ā′shən)
n.
1. Conversion of one substance into another.
2. In many Christian churches, the doctrine holding that the bread and wine of the Eucharist are transformed into the body and blood of Jesus, although their appearances remain the same.

tran′sub·stan′ti·a′tion·al·ist n.

transubstantiation

(ˌtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) (esp in Roman Catholic theology)
a. the doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
b. the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration. Compare consubstantiation
2. a substantial change; transmutation
ˌtransubˌstantiˈationalist n

tran•sub•stan•ti•a•tion

(ˌtræn səbˌstæn ʃiˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the changing of one substance into another.
2. (in the Eucharist) the conversion of the whole substance of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, only the appearance of bread and wine remaining.

transubstantiation

the doctrine that the consecrated elements of the communion only appear as bread and wine, for they have been converted into the whole substance of the body and blood of Christ. Cf. consubstantiation, receptionism, virtualism. — transubstantiationalist, n.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharisttransubstantiation - the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
2.transubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of somethingtransubstantiation - an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
conversion - the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another

transubstantiation

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
eðlisbreytingeðlisbreytingarkenningingjörbreytingmyndbreytingummyndun

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən] Ntransubstanciación f

transubstantiation

n (Rel) → Wandlung f, → Transsubstantiation f (spec)

transubstantiation

[ˈtrænsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃn] n (Rel) → transustanziazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
This leaves people who suffer from gluten intolerance little choice but to refrain from partaking in the occasion that observes doctrine of transubstantiation, according to which the Communion wafer and wine symbolizes the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ respectively.
Roman Catholics believe bread and wine served at the Eucharist are converted into the body and blood of Christ through a process known as transubstantiation.
The book focuses on the operations of disknowledge in several areas of human knowledge, ranging from transubstantiation, to Kabbalah, to human reproduction, to concepts of fictionality.
In addition to a careful examination of the primary text, George uses both John Tillotson's discussion of transubstantiation and Ludwig Wittgenstein's discussions of religion to elucidate Hume's arguments.
I'm not sure how much of this wine goes through transubstantiation (you might have to google that) before it's consumed, but it's a fair drop.
By the words of Jesus and the power of His Spirit, He turned simple bread and wine into His Body and Blood in a divine act which the Church calls Transubstantiation.
When he was appointed commander of Virginia's military forces, George Washington was required to sign an anti-Catholic "test oath" disclaiming belief in such doctrines as transubstantiation, the changing of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.
presents readers with a veritable confrontation between Lonergan and Chauvet on the proper understanding of the relationship between metaphysics and sacramental theology, and, more narrowly, transubstantiation.
1) The images transformation into bread reiterates what the previous testing--by stabbing, nailing, boiling, and baking--of the consecrated Host by the play's Jews has demonstrated, namely the truth of the doctrine of transubstantiation, that at the moment of consecration in the mass, the substance of the obley becomes the body of Christ.
In the fraught historical context of the later 16th century, argues Wald, writers who wanted to comment on the Eucharist debate could not use the word transubstantiation or other Eucharist terminology without taking sides in the political and religious struggles of the day, so developed new narratives about transformation and disguise.
On the one hand, we find talk of saints and believers, the divine, transubstantiation, and brief--almost quipped--lines of apparent prayer and direct address to the "Lord.
A disbelief in transubstantiation casts the priest's consecration as a magic trick, as hocus pocus, not a sacramental tenet.