transumption

Related to transumption: Metaleptic

transumption

(trænˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. an act of metaphorical transference
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) anthropol previously, the ritual of eating the dead bodies of loved ones in tribes of Papua New Guinea and India
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References in periodicals archive ?
For Bloom, the final trope of misreading is "a metalepsis or transumption of the process of reading (and writing) poems, a final ratio of revision that I have named apophrades, or the return of the precursors" (73).
In Bloom's account, the "primal scene of instruction" enacts a "scheme of transumption or metaleptic reversal" (49) in an attempt to "recover the prestige of origins" (59), and that is precisely what is accomplished in the closing image of the poem, which presents a prophecy of desired union that is also a return to--and reversal of--the traumatic break with tradition out of which Ashbery's "new music" is born.
Turner use transumption to create their unique views of the world.
Magnuson pays close attention to tropes of mediation and address, such as apostrophe and prosopopoeia, and he highlights most prominently the trope of allusion--particularly transumption, or interpretive allusion.
For Genette, a transumption or metalepsis is the transit of a character from one diegetic level to another (234); this can be taken to correspond to the transit among sealed cosmic levels in an allegorical cosmography--Dante's ascent to paradiso or the Keplerian Daemon's descent to Earth.
Blicero's transumption into the Zone provides a sobering counterpoint to the potentially liberating quality of Slothrop's own textualization.
Elliot, "The Ethics of Repression: Deconstruction's Historical Transumption of History," New Literary History, Vol.
Keats manages, or seems to manage, his transumption of Shakespeare when the Shakespearean figure is left with the consciousness of a latecomer, is left, that is, conscious of belatedness.
after all, in something like a Bloomian transumption or metaleptic
Indeed, Harold Bloom uses metalepsis for his ultimate trope of revision, and applies it to Emerson's relationship to his poetic predecessors: transumption is "a total, final act of taking up a poetic stance in relation to anteriority of poetic language, which means primarily the loved-and-feared poems of the precursors.
As noted earlier, Quintilian relates transumption to catachresis and abusio in his list of tropes that effect a change of a word's meaning.
Transumption is "a kind of referring over; the transumed material is precisely that which is not mentioned in an allusion, and yet which is refashioned" (35).