transuranic element


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Related to transuranic element: noble metal, rare-earth element, Transuranium elements

trans′u•ran′ic el′ement

(ˈtræns yʊˈræn ɪk, ˈtrænz-, ˌtræns-, ˌtrænz-)

also trans•u•ra′ni•um el`ement

(ˌtræns yʊˈreɪ ni əm, ˌtrænz-)

n.
any element having an atomic number greater than 92, the atomic number of uranium.
[1930–35; trans- + uran (ium) + -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transuranic element - any element having an atomic number greater than 92 (which is the atomic number of uranium); all are radioactive
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
References in periodicals archive ?
Which artificial transuranic element is represented by the symbol Fm?
Held in slowly deteriorating metal, wooden and fiberglass boxes and metal drums, the waste includes tools, rags, clothing, sludge and dirt--anything contaminated with a transuranic element, such as plutonium.
In he modern periodic table, the transuranic element of atomic number 101, atomic weight 258, has been named mendelevium; thus contemporary physics commemorates the discoverer in his discovery.
The project was initiated as a result of a 2000 agreement with the Russians, later amended, in which both countries agreed to dispose of no less than 34 metric tons of excess weapons-grade plutonium--the transuranic element that is the key component of a modern nuclear weapon, and remains radioactive essentially forever.
The experiments are usually done by selecting a fusion reaction calculated to yield a particular transuranic element.
A solution for ZINC (atomic number 30) was given in Colloquy in February 2016-thus, [square root of (-26+(9xl4))x3] My good friend Chris Hawkins and his mathematical colleagues Holly Adams and Diane Kendrick (all from Cambridgeshire, England) have now managed to find solutions for all the transuranic elements, those with atomic numbers 93 to 118.
For the transuranic elements nuclei, as calculations are shown, their binding energy should also be reduced by the amount of the alpha particle binding energy.
The elaborate US-initiated Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) seeks to increase plutonium separation capacity around the world while successfully commercializing fast-neutron reactors that would effectively burn up the plutonium and associated transuranic elements produced in the process (thus reducing total volume of waste) by coordinating the efforts of interested national governments.
Transuranic elements with long half-lives are also produced, but it may be possible to render them innocuous; until this can be done, they will have to be stored.
Generation IV fast reactors use a proliferations-resistant fuel cycle that is more than 100 times as efficient, and consumes long-lived transuranic elements in radioactive waste to produce electricity.