traps


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

trap 1

 (trăp)
n.
1. A contrivance for catching and holding animals, as a concealed pit or a clamplike device that springs shut suddenly.
2. A stratagem for catching or tricking an unwary person.
3. A confining or undesirable circumstance from which escape or relief is difficult: fell into poverty's trap.
4. A device for sealing a passage against the escape of gases, especially a U-shaped or S-shaped bend in a drainpipe that prevents the return flow of sewer gas by means of a water barrier.
5. Sports
a. A device that hurls clay pigeons into the air in trapshooting.
b. A land hazard or bunker on a golf course; a sand trap.
c. traps A measured length of roadway over which electronic timers register the speed of a racing vehicle, such as a dragster.
6. Baseball See web.
7. Sports
a. A defensive strategy or play, as in basketball or hockey, in which two or more defenders converge on an offensive player shortly after the player gains possession of the ball or puck.
b. The act of trapping a soccer ball.
8. Football A running play in which the ball carrier advances through a hole in the defensive line created by allowing a defensive lineman to penetrate the backfield.
9. A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.
10. A trapdoor.
11. traps Music Percussion instruments, such as snare drums and cymbals, especially in a jazz band.
12. Slang The human mouth.
v. trapped, trap·ping, traps
v.tr.
1. To catch in a trap; ensnare.
2. To prevent from escaping or getting free: was trapped in the locked attic.
3. To deceive or trick by means of a scheme or plan. See Synonyms at catch.
4. To seal off (gases) by a trap.
5. To furnish with traps or a trap.
6. Sports
a. To catch (a ball) immediately after it has hit the ground.
b. To gain control of (a moving soccer ball) by allowing it to hit and bounce off a part of the body other than the arm or hand.
v.intr.
1. To set traps for game.
2. To engage in trapping furbearing animals.

[Middle English, from Old English træppe.]

trap 2

 (trăp) Archaic
n.
often traps Personal belongings or household goods.
tr.v. trapped, trap·ping, traps
To furnish with trappings.

[Middle English trap, trapping, perhaps alteration of Old French drap, cloth, from Late Latin drappus.]

trap 3

 (trăp)
n.
Any of several dark, fine-grained igneous rocks often used in making roads.

[Swedish trapp, from trappa, step, from Middle Low German trappe.]

traps

(træps)
pl n
belongings; luggage
[C19: probably shortened from trappings]

Traps

 articles of dress; personal effects and belongings, 1813.
References in classic literature ?
So Queequeg and I got down our traps, resolving, however, to sleep ashore till the last.
Tom, now is a hero to Eva; his stories are wonders in her eyes, his songs and Methodist hymns are better than an opera, and the traps and little bits of trash in his pocket a mine of jewels, and he the most wonderful Tom that ever wore a black skin.
Some of these were pretty fine birds, but no matter, they had to tarry outside in the long parlor under the inspection of a double rank of liveried footmen and waiting-maids who supported the two walls with their backs and held the wraps and traps of their masters and mistresses on their arms.
I got my traps out of the canoe and made me a nice camp in the thick woods.
They took their lath swords, dumped their other traps on the ground, struck a fencing attitude, foot to foot, and began a grave, careful combat, "two up and two down.
I want you to pack up your traps and be off to-morrow.
But they answered the call from habit; and some of them were lame from the traps they had fallen into, and some limped from shot wounds, and some were mangy from eating bad food, and many were missing.
He sat in the sun, and conversed cordially with Tommy Brock, who was passing through the wood with a sack and a little spud which he used for digging, and some mole traps.
The Sheriff of Nottingham waxed wroth at the report, but all his traps and excursions failed to catch the outlaws.
She employed her mind on setting traps for her possible lovers, in order to test their real sentiments.
Dick helped her to get her sketching traps together; and when all was ready, she gave Dick her hand and a frank return of pressure.
Then he took my traps, and placed them on the ground beside me as I stood close to a great door, old and studded with large iron nails, and set in a projecting doorway of massive stone.