encephalopathy

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en·ceph·a·lop·a·thy

 (ĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏp′ə-thē)
n. pl. en·ceph·a·lop·a·thies
Any of various diseases of the brain.

en·ceph′a·lo·path′ic (-lə-păth′ĭk) adj.

encephalopathy

(ɛnˌsɛfəˈlɒpəθɪ)
n
(Pathology) any degenerative disease of the brain, often associated with toxic conditions. See also BSE

en•ceph•a•lop•a•thy

(ɛnˌsɛf əˈlɒp ə θi)

n., pl. -thies.
any disease of the brain.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brainencephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
nervous disorder, neurological disease, neurological disorder - a disorder of the nervous system
epilepsy - a disorder of the central nervous system characterized by loss of consciousness and convulsions
apraxia - inability to make purposeful movements
paralysis agitans, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's, Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, shaking palsy - a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
cerebral palsy, spastic paralysis - a loss or deficiency of motor control with involuntary spasms caused by permanent brain damage present at birth
agraphia, anorthography, logagraphia - a loss of the ability to write or to express thoughts in writing because of a brain lesion
acataphasia - a disorder in which a lesion to the central nervous system leaves you unable to formulate a statement or to express yourself in an organized manner
aphasia - inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion
agnosia - inability to recognize objects by use of the senses
CJD, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease - rare (usually fatal) brain disease (usually in middle age) caused by an unidentified slow virus; characterized by progressive dementia and gradual loss of muscle control
Reye's syndrome - acquired encephalopathy following acute viral infections (especially influenza or chicken pox) in young children; characterized by fever, vomiting, disorientation, coma, and fatty infiltration of the liver
Wernicke's encephalopathy - inflammatory degenerative disease of the brain caused by thiamine deficiency that is usually associated with alcoholism
Translations

en·ceph·a·lop·a·thy

, encephalopathia
n. encefalopatía, cualquier enfermedad cerebral.

encephalopathy

n encefalopatía; bovine spongiform — encefalopatía espongiforme bovina, enfermedad f de las vacas locas (fam); chronic traumatic — encefalopatía traumática crónica; hepatic — encefalopatía hepática; Wernicke’s — encefalopatía de Wernicke
References in periodicals archive ?
At the more extreme end of the damage spectrum, biopsies of the brains of six former NFL players between the ages of 25 and 50 who had experienced multiple concussions during their careers revealed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, according to investigators at Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE).
A neuro-pathological review of Duerson's brain at Boston University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy determined that he was suffering from progressive, advanced brain damage, commonly referred to as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy ("CTE"), which caused or contributed to Duerson's death, according to the lawsuit.
He called the disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.
Shayanna Jenkins-Hernandez, the fiancAaAaAeA@e of the late New England Patrio star Aaron Hernandez, is suing both the team as well as the National Football League for failing to alert him to the dangers of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated head trauma.
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the brain disease increasingly associated with football, is so disturbing because we know that it is exceedingly rare for a player to still be suiting up at age 40, which is about the age when the rest of us are really amassing the kind of crystallized intelligence that will power us through our most productive working years.
The NFL has not previously linked playing football to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease linked to repeated brain trauma and associated with symptoms such as memory loss, depression and progressive dementia.
smith as Bennet Omalu Cross-sections of the player's brain reveal that he was suffering from a progressive degenerative brain condition, which Omalu christens chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).
If that child continues to play over many seasons, these cellular injuries accumulate to cause irreversible brain damage, which we know now by the name Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE, a disease that I first diagnosed in 2002.
Among the topics are upright MRI of the craniocervical junction; concussion update: immuno-excito-toxicity, the common etiology of post-concussion syndrome, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and post-traumatic stress disorder; cerebrospinal fluid physiology and its role in neurologic disease; positional venous magnetic resonance angiography; and the possible role of craniocervical trauma and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the genesis of multiple sclerosis and the craniocervical syndrome.
It is expected that 6,000 of the NFL's 20,000 retired players will develop Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), formerly known as dementia pugilistica, as a result of repetitive head trauma -- a fact the NFL had tried to deny since a link was discovered by neuropathologists in 2002, until they were forced to settle under pressure from Congress in 2013.
But a re-examination of his brain last May conrmed he died from Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease that can be caused by repea t low-level head traumas.
But an examination of his brain last year showed he died with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, caused by regularly heading the ball.