traversing


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tra·verse

 (trə-vûrs′, trăv′ərs)
v. tra·versed, tra·vers·ing, tra·vers·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To travel or pass across, over, or through: a ship traversing a channel; light traversing a window.
b. To move to and fro over; cross and recross: traversed the room in thought for an hour.
c. To go up, down, or across (a slope) diagonally, as in skiing.
2. To cause to move laterally on a pivot; swivel: traverse an artillery piece.
3. To extend across; cross: a bridge that traverses a river.
4. To look over carefully; examine: "Someday I plan to read the classics. Someday I plan to traverse their pages and see for myself what raw weight they wield" (Beck Hansen).
5. Archaic To go counter to; thwart.
6. Law
a. To deny formally (an allegation of fact by the opposing party) in a lawsuit.
b. To join issue upon (an indictment).
7. To survey by traverse.
8. Nautical To brace (a yard) fore and aft.
v.intr.
1. To move to the side or back and forth.
2. To turn laterally; swivel.
3.
a. To go up, down, or across a slope diagonally or in a zigzag manner, as in skiing.
b. To slide one's blade with pressure toward the hilt of the opponent's foil in fencing.
n. trav·erse (trăv′ərs, trə-vûrs′)
1. A passing across, over, or through.
2. A route or path across or over.
3. Something that lies across, especially:
a. An intersecting line; a transversal.
b. Architecture A structural crosspiece; a transom.
c. A gallery, deck, or loft crossing from one side of a building to the other.
d. A railing, curtain, screen, or similar barrier.
e. A defensive barrier across a rampart or trench, as a bank of earth thrown up to protect against enfilade fire.
4. Something that obstructs and thwarts; an obstacle.
5. Nautical The zigzag route of a vessel forced by contrary winds to sail on different courses.
6. A zigzag or diagonal course on a steep slope, as in skiing.
7.
a. A lateral movement, as of a lathe tool across a piece of wood.
b. A part of a mechanism that moves in this manner.
c. The lateral swivel of a mounted gun.
8. A line established by sighting in surveying a tract of land.
9. Law A formal denial of the opposing party's allegation of fact in a lawsuit.
adj. trav·erse (trăv′ərs, trə-vûrs′)
Lying or extending across; transverse.

[Middle English traversen, from Old French traverser, from Vulgar Latin *trāversāre, from Late Latin trānsversāre, from Latin trānsversus, transverse; see transverse.]

tra·vers′a·ble adj.
tra·vers′al n.
tra·vers′er n.
References in classic literature ?
It was the subject of my meditations for many an hour, while pacing to and fro across my room, or traversing, with a hundredfold repetition, the long extent from the front door of the Custom-House to the side entrance, and back again.
With a memory sharpened to almost preternatural clearness, she remarked every turn in the road, and formed a mental estimate of the time to be occupied in traversing it.
At the end of half an hour Tom had a vague general idea of his lesson, but no more, for his mind was traversing the whole field of human thought, and his hands were busy with dis- tracting recreations.
For the rest, the Old Bailey was famous as a kind of deadly inn-yard, from which pale travellers set out continually, in carts and coaches, on a violent passage into the other world: traversing some two miles and a half of public street and road, and shaming few good citizens, if any.
By Night he fled, and at Midnight return'd From compassing the Earth, cautious of day, Since URIEL Regent of the Sun descri'd His entrance, and forewarnd the Cherubim That kept thir watch; thence full of anguish driv'n, The space of seven continu'd Nights he rode With darkness, thrice the Equinoctial Line He circl'd, four times cross'd the Carr of Night From Pole to Pole, traversing each Colure; On the eighth return'd, and on the Coast averse From entrance or Cherubic Watch, by stealth Found unsuspected way.
I will form new paths to greatness,'' he continued, again traversing the room with hasty strides ``Europe shall hear the loud step of him she has driven from her sons
Yes, my noble friends," he continued, addressing the company, "l assure you that my adventures have been strange enough to deter even the most avaricious men from seeking wealth by traversing the seas.
Scarce had the rubicund Apollo spread o'er the face of the broad spacious earth the golden threads of his bright hair, scarce had the little birds of painted plumage attuned their notes to hail with dulcet and mellifluous harmony the coming of the rosy Dawn, that, deserting the soft couch of her jealous spouse, was appearing to mortals at the gates and balconies of the Manchegan horizon, when the renowned knight Don Quixote of La Mancha, quitting the lazy down, mounted his celebrated steed Rocinante and began to traverse the ancient and famous Campo de Montiel;'" which in fact he was actually traversing.
In a short time we gained the foot of the mountains, and after traversing a narrow gorge came to an open valley, at the far extremity of which was a low table land upon which I beheld an enormous city.
Then suddenly traversing a little glade, I saw with an unpleasant start two clumsy legs among the trees, walking with noiseless footsteps parallel with my course, and perhaps thirty yards away from me.
While retracing the past, I forget the present; and traversing at will the path of history I cease to remember that I am myself a prisoner.
In ten minutes Mazarin and his party were traversing the street "Les Bons Enfants" behind the theatre built by Richelieu expressly for the play of "Mirame," and in which Mazarin, who was an amateur of music, but not of literature, had introduced into France the first opera that was ever acted in that country.