tray


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tray

 (trā)
n.
1. A shallow flat receptacle with a raised edge or rim, used for carrying, holding, or displaying articles.
2. A shallow flat receptacle with its contents: took the patient a dinner tray.

[Middle English, from Old English trēg; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

tray

(treɪ)
n
1. (Furniture) a thin flat board or plate of metal, plastic, etc, usually with a raised edge, on which things can be carried
2. (Furniture) a shallow receptacle for papers, etc, sometimes forming a drawer in a cabinet or box
[Old English trieg; related to Old Swedish trö corn measure, Old Norse treyja carrier, Greek driti tub, German Trog trough]

tray

(treɪ)

n.
1. a flat, shallow container or receptacle, usu. with slightly raised edges, used for carrying, holding, or displaying articles.
2. a removable receptacle of this shape in a cabinet, box, trunk, etc.
3. a tray and its contents: a breakfast tray.
[before 1050; Middle English; late Old English trīg, c. early Swedish trö corn measure; akin to tree]

tray

  • salver - A tray or dish on which a drink, letter, calling card, etc. is offered.
  • tray - The drawer for storing a body at a mortuary.
  • trencher - A platter or tray for serving food.
  • plateau - Can refer to an ornamented dish or tray for serving food.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tray - an open receptacle for holding or displaying or serving articles or foodtray - an open receptacle for holding or displaying or serving articles or food
alms dish, alms tray - a tray for collecting the offering from a congregation
cafeteria tray - a tray for carrying your food in a cafeteria
cheese tray, cheeseboard - tray on which cheeses are served
icetray - a tray for making cubes of ice in a refrigerator
inkstand - a tray or stand for writing implements and containers for ink
receptacle - a container that is used to put or keep things in
salver - a tray (or large plate) for serving food or drinks; usually made of silver
tea tray - a tray that accommodates a tea service
lazy Susan, turntable - a revolving tray placed on a dining table
Translations
صِينِيَّةصينيَّه
táctácek
bakke=-bakke
tarjotinkelkka
poslužavnik
tálca
bakki
쟁반
paplāte
pladenj
bricka
ถาด
khay

tray

[treɪ]
A. N (for food, dishes) → bandeja f, charola f (Mex); (= tea tray) → bandeja f del; (= filing tray) → cesta f; [of balance] → platillo m; (= drawer) → cajón m, batea f (Phot, Tech) → cubeta f
B. CPD tray cloth Ncubrebandeja m

tray

[ˈtreɪ] n
(for carrying)plateau m
(on desk)corbeille f

tray

nTablett nt; (= tea tray)Teebrett nt, → Servierbrett nt; (of cakes, small) → Platte f; (big) → Brett nt; (for display) → Auslagekästchen nt; (= baking tray)(Back)blech nt; (for pencils etc) → (Feder)schale f; (for papers, mail) → Ablage f; (= drawer)(Schub)fach nt; (of printer)Schacht m; (of street vendor etc)Bauchladen m; (in suitcase, trunk) → Einsatz m; (Phot: = ice tray) → Schale f; (for ash) → Kasten m; (in bird cage) → Schublade f

tray

[treɪ] n (for carrying) → vassoio; (filing tray) → vassoio per la corrispondenza

tray

(trei) noun
a flat piece of wood, metal etc with a low edge, for carrying dishes etc. She brought in the tea on a tray; a tea-tray.

tray

صِينِيَّة tác bakke Tablett δίσκος bandeja tarjotin plateau poslužavnik vassoio 쟁반 dienblad brett taca bandeja поднос bricka ถาด tepsi khay 托盘

tray

n bandeja, charola (Mex)
References in classic literature ?
So a tray was fitted out before anyone began, and taken up with the cook's compliments.
With something approaching a girlhood swing to her body she walked along, but when she had got back to her chair by the window of her room and when dark- ness had come on and a girl from the hotel dining room brought her dinner on a tray, she let it grow cold.
Steavens," Antonia said from the bed, "if you'll look in the top tray of my trunk, you'll see some fine soap.
A light-colored mulatto boy, in dress coat and bearing a diminutive silver tray for the reception of cards, admitted them.
To attend to all this and fill several hundred cans of lard per hour, there were necessary two human creatures, one of whom knew how to place an empty lard can on a certain spot every few seconds, and the other of whom knew how to take a full lard can off a certain spot every few seconds and set it upon a tray.
The names of men are, of course, as cheap and meaningless as BOSE and TRAY, the names of dogs.
These were a specialty of Miss Jane's, and Rebecca carried a tray with six tiny crystal glasses filled with dandelion wine, for which Miss Miranda had been famous in years gone by.
It was put into a large wooden tray or trough, and set down upon the ground.
Cole's carriagehorses returning from exercise, or a stray letterboy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, and a string of dawdling children round the baker's little bowwindow eyeing the gingerbread, she knew she had no reason to complain, and was amused enough; quite enough still to stand at the door.
The tall girls went out and returned presently, each bearing a tray, with portions of something, I knew not what, arranged thereon, and a pitcher of water and mug in the middle of each tray.
I smelt the rich scent of the heating spices; and admired the shining kitchen utensils, the polished clock, decked in holly, the silver mugs ranged on a tray ready to be filled with mulled ale for supper; and above all, the speckless purity of my particular care - the scoured and well-swept floor.
The first was the best room, and in it were Lucie's birds, and flowers, and books, and desk, and work-table, and box of water-colours; the second was the Doctor's consulting-room, used also as the dining-room; the third, changingly speckled by the rustle of the plane-tree in the yard, was the Doctor's bedroom, and there, in a corner, stood the disused shoemaker's bench and tray of tools, much as it had stood on the fifth floor of the dismal house by the wine-shop, in the suburb of Saint Antoine in Paris.