treachery


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treach·er·y

 (trĕch′ə-rē)
n. pl. treach·er·ies
1. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust; perfidy.
2. The act or an instance of such betrayal.

[Middle English trecherie, from Old French, from trichier, to trick, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccāre; see trick.]

treachery

(ˈtrɛtʃərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. the act or an instance of wilful betrayal
2. the disposition to betray
[C13: from Old French trecherie, from trechier to cheat; compare trick]

treach•er•y

(ˈtrɛtʃ ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. violation of faith; betrayal of trust.
2. an act of perfidy, faithlessness, or treason.
[1175–1225; Middle English trecherie < Old French, =trech(ier) to deceive + -erie -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treachery - betrayal of a trusttreachery - betrayal of a trust      
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
insidiousness - the quality of being designed to entrap
2.treachery - an act of deliberate betrayaltreachery - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treachery

treachery

noun
1. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
3. An act of betraying:
Slang: sellout.
Translations
غَدْر، خِيانَه
zrada
forræderi
árulás1
svik
izdaja
hainlikkalleşlik

treachery

[ˈtretʃərɪ] Ntraición f
an act of treacheryuna traición

treachery

[ˈtrɛtʃəri] ntraîtrise f

treachery

nVerrat m; (of weather)Tücke f; an act of treacheryVerrat m, → eine verräterische Tat

treachery

[ˈtrɛtʃrɪ] nslealtà f inv
an act of treachery → un tradimento

treacherous

(ˈtretʃərəs) adjective
1. betraying or likely to betray. a treacherous person/act.
2. dangerous. The roads are treacherous in winter.
ˈtreacherously adverb
ˈtreacherousness noun
ˈtreachery noun
(an act of) betraying someone; disloyalty. His treachery led to the capture and imprisonment of his friend.
References in classic literature ?
The two tents housing the four white members of the Bumper party were close together, and it was decided that the night would be divided into four watches, to guard against possible treachery on the part of the Beecher crowd.
Setting aside all advantages of rank, this fair girl deemed herself conscious of a power --combined of beauty, high, unsullied purity, and the preservative force of womanhood--that could make her sphere impenetrable, unless betrayed by treachery within.
Upon hearing the frantic project of their leader, each in his own separate soul had suddenly lighted, it would seem, upon the same piece of treachery, namely: to be foremost in breaking out, in order to be the first of the three, though the last of the ten, to surrender; and thereby secure whatever small chance of pardon such conduct might merit.
He did not want to commit this treachery, but luck threw the man in his way, and this saved him the necessity of going up-country to hunt up a purchaser, with the added risk of having to answer a lot of questions, whereas this planter was so pleased with Roxy that he asked next to none at all.
He could now, without the drawback of a single unpleasant surmise, without a glance forward at any possible treachery in his guest, give way to all his natural kindhearted civility in solicitous inquiries after Mr.
The treachery, or the folly, of my cousin's maid betrayed us.
As he had said, there was probably nothing at all extraordinary in the substance of the narrative itself: a wealthy Englishman's passion for a French dancer, and her treachery to him, were every- day matters enough, no doubt, in society; but there was something decidedly strange in the paroxysm of emotion which had suddenly seized him when he was in the act of expressing the present contentment of his mood, and his newly revived pleasure in the old hall and its environs.
I'm weary of enduring now," I replied; "and I'd be glad of a retaliation that wouldn't recoil on myself; but treachery and violence are spears pointed at both ends; they wound those who resort to them worse than their enemies.
The efforts which he had made -bluntly and incautiously, I own, but with the purest and kindest intentions, as I know -- to compose the quarrel before leaving home, were perverted, by the vilest misconstruction, to support an accusation of treachery and falsehood which would have stung any man to the quick.
They persisted in changing colour sometimes, and they would be occasionally dilated and contracted by something like a faint pulsation; then, they gave a look of treachery, and cruelty, to the whole countenance.
But if any fraud or treachery is practising against him, I hope that simple love and truth will be strong in the end.
Now some of those were with me were afraid, and would have turned back, fearing treachery, and they were yet more afraid when, on coming to the inner entrance of the cattle kraal, we saw some five hundred soldiers being mustered there company by company, by two great men, who ran up and down the ranks shouting.