treachery


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treach·er·y

 (trĕch′ə-rē)
n. pl. treach·er·ies
1. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust; perfidy.
2. The act or an instance of such betrayal.

[Middle English trecherie, from Old French, from trichier, to trick, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccāre; see trick.]

treachery

(ˈtrɛtʃərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. the act or an instance of wilful betrayal
2. the disposition to betray
[C13: from Old French trecherie, from trechier to cheat; compare trick]

treach•er•y

(ˈtrɛtʃ ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. violation of faith; betrayal of trust.
2. an act of perfidy, faithlessness, or treason.
[1175–1225; Middle English trecherie < Old French, =trech(ier) to deceive + -erie -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treachery - betrayal of a trusttreachery - betrayal of a trust      
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
insidiousness - the quality of being designed to entrap
2.treachery - an act of deliberate betrayaltreachery - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treachery

treachery

noun
1. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
3. An act of betraying:
Slang: sellout.
Translations
غَدْر، خِيانَه
zrada
forræderi
árulás1
svik
izdaja
hainlikkalleşlik

treachery

[ˈtretʃərɪ] Ntraición f
an act of treacheryuna traición

treachery

[ˈtrɛtʃəri] ntraîtrise f

treachery

nVerrat m; (of weather)Tücke f; an act of treacheryVerrat m, → eine verräterische Tat

treachery

[ˈtrɛtʃrɪ] nslealtà f inv
an act of treachery → un tradimento

treacherous

(ˈtretʃərəs) adjective
1. betraying or likely to betray. a treacherous person/act.
2. dangerous. The roads are treacherous in winter.
ˈtreacherously adverb
ˈtreacherousness noun
ˈtreachery noun
(an act of) betraying someone; disloyalty. His treachery led to the capture and imprisonment of his friend.
References in classic literature ?
Therefore being condemned by each for his treachery, he was driven forth from the light of day, and henceforth concealed himself in dark hiding-places, flying always alone and at night.
Treachery I knew he meant; my death, for one; my death was certain; and yet I could not speak.
After having combined with the Executive in betraying the interests of the nation in a ruinous treaty, what prospect, it is asked, would there be of their being made to suffer the punishment they would deserve, when they were themselves to decide upon the accusation brought against them for the treachery of which they have been guilty?
Take it as an insult if in your heart there is no shadow of treachery towards the France that is today, towards the cause of the Allies as it is to-day," was the stern answer.
Such perfidious Treachery in the merciless perpetrators of the Deed will shock your gentle nature Dearest Marianne as much as it then affected the Delicate sensibility of Edward, Sophia, your Laura, and of Augustus himself.
Moreover, the experience of treachery seemed to spread a hopeless drowsiness over my thoughts and senses.
There was no such thing as court design or treachery in their thought; but M'Lellan, when he heard that Lisa was on his way up the river, renewed his open threat of shooting him the moment he met him on Indian land.
It may be treachery," said Prince Andrew, vividly imagining the gray overcoats, wounds, the smoke of gunpowder, the sounds of firing, and the glory that awaited him.
A horrible punishment was come upon her for the sin of allowing a moment's happiness that was treachery to Lucy, to Philip, to her own better soul.
Once upon a time an Indian hunter built himself a house in the middle of a great forest, far away from all his tribe; for his heart was gentle and kind, and he was weary of the treachery and cruel deeds of those who had been his friends.
If she had been left in ignorance of the manner of her father's death--as Alban had designed to leave her; as she would have been left, but for the treachery of Francine--how happily free she would have been from thoughts which it was now a terror to her to recall.
He knew the nature of that good man to be so averse to any baseness or treachery, that the least attempt of such a kind would make the sight of the guilty person for ever odious to his eyes, and his name a detestable sound in his ears.