treason


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to treason: high treason

trea·son

 (trē′zən)
n.
1. The betrayal of allegiance toward one's own country, especially by committing hostile acts against it or aiding its enemies in committing such acts.
2. The betrayal of someone's trust or confidence.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman treson, from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, a handing over; see tradition.]

treason

(ˈtriːzən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) violation or betrayal of the allegiance that a person owes his sovereign or his country, esp by attempting to overthrow the government; high treason
2. any treachery or betrayal
[C13: from Old French traïson, from Latin trāditiō a handing over; see tradition, traditor]
ˈtreasonable, ˈtreasonous adj
ˈtreasonableness n
ˈtreasonably adv

trea•son

(ˈtri zən)

n.
1. the offense of acting to overthrow one's government or to harm or kill its sovereign.
2. a violation of allegiance to one's sovereign or state.
3. the betrayal of a trust or confidence; treachery.
[1175–1225; Middle English tre(i)so(u)n < Anglo-French; Old French traïson < Latin trāditiōnem, acc. of trāditiō a handing over. See tradition]
syn: treason, sedition mean disloyalty or treachery to one's country or its government. treason is any attempt to overthrow the government or impair the well-being of a state to which one owes allegiance. According to the U.S. Constitution, it is the crime of levying war against the U.S. or giving aid and comfort to its enemies. sedition is any act, writing, speech, etc., directed unlawfully against state authority, the government, or the constitution, or calculated to bring it into contempt or to incite others to hostility or disaffection; it does not amount to treason and therefore is not a capital offense.

treason

Violation of the allegiance owed to one's sovereign or state; betrayal of one's country.

Treason

See also crime.

an act of cooperating with an invader of one’s country. — collaborationist, n.
1. breach of trust, especially treachery or treason.
2. an act or instance of this. — perfidious, adj.
cowardice, treason, or disloyalty. — recreant, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treason - a crime that undermines the offender's governmenttreason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
2.treason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behaviortreason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
betrayal - the quality of aiding an enemy
3.treason - an act of deliberate betrayaltreason - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treason

noun disloyalty, mutiny, treachery, subversion, disaffection, duplicity, sedition, perfidy, lese-majesty, traitorousness Queen of England for nine days, she was beheaded for treason.
loyalty, allegiance, fidelity, patriotism, faithfulness, fealty
Quotations
"Treason doth never prosper, what's the reason"
"For if it prosper, none dare call it treason" [Sir John Harington Epigrams]

treason

noun
1. Willful violation of allegiance to one's country:
2. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
Translations
خِيانَه
velezradavlastizradazrada
højforræderilandsforræderi
hazaárulás
föîurlandssvik, landráî
išdavimas
nodevība
vlastizrada
izdaja
vatana ihanet

treason

[ˈtriːzn] Ntraición f
high treasonalta traición f

treason

[ˈtriːzən] ntrahison f

treason

nVerrat m (→ to an +dat); an act of treasonVerrat m

treason

[ˈtriːzn] ntradimento

treason

(ˈtriːzn) noun
(also high treason) disloyalty to, or betrayal of, one's own country. They were convicted of (high) treason.
References in classic literature ?
Some ran furiously to the water's edge, beating the air with frantic gestures, while others spat upon the element, to resent the supposed treason it had committed against their acknowledged rights as conquerors.
But with Ona's dead body beneath his eyes, Jurgis could not well think of treason to his child.
In such minds, disregard of religion is a more fearful treason,--a more deadly sin.
For the nine hundred and ninety-four to express dis- satisfaction with the regnant system and propose to change it, would have made the whole six shudder as one man, it would have been so disloyal, so dishonor- able, such putrid black treason.
The Queen is insulted by my haughtiness equal to treason, but no punishment even blood, will not be able to wash out the disgrace, which you have suffered by me.
By agreement, the conversation in Roxy's presence was all about the man's "up-country" farm, and how pleasant a place it was, and how happy the slaves were there; so poor Roxy was entirely deceived; and easily, for she was not dreaming that her own son could be guilty of treason to a mother who, in voluntarily going into slavery--slavery of any kind, mild or severe, or of any duration, brief or long--was making a sacrifice for him compared with which death would have been a poor and commonplace one.
There the bottle lay, in Magdalen's absence, a false witness of treason which had never entered her mind -- treason against her husband's life!
You see the fault becomes a virtue when it is hers, the treason prospers; wherefore, no doubt, the impossibility of imagining it.
But yet all is not don; Man disobeying, Disloyal breaks his fealtie, and sinns Against the high Supremacie of Heav'n, Affecting God-head, and so loosing all, To expiate his Treason hath naught left, But to destruction sacred and devote, He with his whole posteritie must die, Die hee or Justice must; unless for him Som other able, and as willing, pay The rigid satisfaction, death for death.
uf, or Philip de Malvoisin, that thou hast spoken treason against the Norman, and thou art but a cast-away swineherd, thou wouldst waver on one of these trees as a terror to all evil speakers against dignities.
This lord, in conjunction with Flimnap the high-treasurer, whose enmity against you is notorious on account of his lady, Limtoc the general, Lalcon the chamberlain, and Balmuff the grand justiciary, have prepared articles of impeachment against you, for treason and other capital crimes.
The President of the United States would be liable to be impeached, tried, and, upon conviction of treason, bribery, or other high crimes or misdemeanors, removed from office; and would afterwards be liable to prosecution and punishment in the ordinary course of law.