treason

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trea·son

 (trē′zən)
n.
1. The betrayal of allegiance toward one's own country, especially by committing hostile acts against it or aiding its enemies in committing such acts.
2. The betrayal of someone's trust or confidence.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman treson, from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, a handing over; see tradition.]

treason

(ˈtriːzən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) violation or betrayal of the allegiance that a person owes his sovereign or his country, esp by attempting to overthrow the government; high treason
2. any treachery or betrayal
[C13: from Old French traïson, from Latin trāditiō a handing over; see tradition, traditor]
ˈtreasonable, ˈtreasonous adj
ˈtreasonableness n
ˈtreasonably adv

trea•son

(ˈtri zən)

n.
1. the offense of acting to overthrow one's government or to harm or kill its sovereign.
2. a violation of allegiance to one's sovereign or state.
3. the betrayal of a trust or confidence; treachery.
[1175–1225; Middle English tre(i)so(u)n < Anglo-French; Old French traïson < Latin trāditiōnem, acc. of trāditiō a handing over. See tradition]
syn: treason, sedition mean disloyalty or treachery to one's country or its government. treason is any attempt to overthrow the government or impair the well-being of a state to which one owes allegiance. According to the U.S. Constitution, it is the crime of levying war against the U.S. or giving aid and comfort to its enemies. sedition is any act, writing, speech, etc., directed unlawfully against state authority, the government, or the constitution, or calculated to bring it into contempt or to incite others to hostility or disaffection; it does not amount to treason and therefore is not a capital offense.

treason

Violation of the allegiance owed to one's sovereign or state; betrayal of one's country.

Treason

See also crime.

an act of cooperating with an invader of one’s country. — collaborationist, n.
1. breach of trust, especially treachery or treason.
2. an act or instance of this. — perfidious, adj.
cowardice, treason, or disloyalty. — recreant, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treason - a crime that undermines the offender's governmenttreason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
2.treason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behaviortreason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
betrayal - the quality of aiding an enemy
3.treason - an act of deliberate betrayaltreason - an act of deliberate betrayal  
knavery, dishonesty - lack of honesty; acts of lying or cheating or stealing
double cross, double-crossing - an act of betrayal; "he gave us the old double cross"; "I could no longer tolerate his impudent double-crossing"
sellout - an act of betrayal

treason

noun disloyalty, mutiny, treachery, subversion, disaffection, duplicity, sedition, perfidy, lese-majesty, traitorousness Queen of England for nine days, she was beheaded for treason.
loyalty, allegiance, fidelity, patriotism, faithfulness, fealty
Quotations
"Treason doth never prosper, what's the reason"
"For if it prosper, none dare call it treason" [Sir John Harington Epigrams]

treason

noun
1. Willful violation of allegiance to one's country:
2. Willful betrayal of fidelity, confidence, or trust:
Translations
خِيانَه
velezradavlastizradazrada
højforræderilandsforræderi
hazaárulás
föîurlandssvik, landráî
išdavimas
nodevība
vlastizrada
izdaja
vatana ihanet

treason

[ˈtriːzn] Ntraición f
high treasonalta traición f

treason

[ˈtriːzən] ntrahison f

treason

nVerrat m (→ to an +dat); an act of treasonVerrat m

treason

[ˈtriːzn] ntradimento

treason

(ˈtriːzn) noun
(also high treason) disloyalty to, or betrayal of, one's own country. They were convicted of (high) treason.
References in classic literature ?
But as new-fangled and artificial treasons have been the great engines by which violent factions, the natural offspring of free government, have usually wreaked their alternate malignity on each other, the convention have, with great judgment, opposed a barrier to this peculiar danger, by inserting a constitutional definition of the crime, fixing the proof necessary for conviction of it, and restraining the Congress, even in punishing it, from extending the consequences of guilt beyond the person of its author.
To declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person attained.
Did no memory of past kindliness cross his mind as he likened his friend to "Cain, that first murderer," as he complained to the court that too much favor was shown to the prisoner, that he had never before heard "so ill a defense of such great and notorious treasons.
Again he was made prisoner and tried for high treason.
Then, worn out by deceit, treasons, infidelity, and the whole body of terrestrial misery, what does he find at the end of his career?
Treason prosecutions may have several potential benefits including reinforcing societal identity and unity, deterring future treasons, providing retribution against the traitor, and clarifying the procedural system under which terrorism should be addressed.
These benefits, however, must be weighed against dangers from the prosecutions, including unjustifiably aggrandizing the threat from a terrorist group, signaling weakness on the part of the prosecuting government and state, biasing the adjudication of the charges against the traitor defendant, and presenting a difficult question of whether the death penalty--the historic punishment for treason--is appropriate for treasons that did not result in death.
Cardinal Fisher had been convicted under the Act of Treasons passed in November 1534.
His head was par-boiled and set up on a pike on London Bridge as a warning to all of the consequences of treason.
As Richard acknowledges in the moments prior to his death, there is a painful correspondence between sovereignty and treason, as if one condition produces the other which haunts and dispossesses it: "Sometimes am I king, / Then treasons make me wish myself a beggar, / And so I am" (5.
Specifically, formal accusations of treason provide an induction into the distinct regimes presided over by Richard and Bolingbroke, and the adjudication of these helps decipher their respective strategies of governance, as well as the forms of opposition they arouse.
The pilgrims wanted the revocation of the Act of Supremacy and the Act of Treasons, which attempted to subject religion to politics and conscience to loyalty.