treatise


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trea·tise

 (trē′tĭs)
n.
A systematic, usually extensive written discourse on a subject.

[Middle English treatis, from Anglo-Norman tretiz, alteration of treteiz, from Vulgar Latin *tractātīcius, from Latin tractātus, past participle of tractāre, to drag about, deal with; see treat.]

treatise

(ˈtriːtɪz)
n
1. a formal work on a subject, esp one that deals systematically with its principles and conclusions
2. an obsolete word for narrative
[C14: from Anglo-French tretiz, from Old French tretier to treat]

trea•tise

(ˈtri tɪs)

n.
a formal and systematic exposition in writing of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than an essay.
[1300–50; Middle English tretis < Anglo-French tretiz, akin to Old French traitier to treat]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treatise - a formal expositiontreatise - a formal exposition      
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
dissertation, thesis - a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
pamphlet, tract - a brief treatise on a subject of interest; published in the form of a booklet
monograph - a detailed and documented treatise on a particular subject

treatise

noun paper, work, writing, study, essay, thesis, tract, pamphlet, exposition, dissertation, monograph, disquisition Locke's treatise on Civil Government

treatise

noun
A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
Translations
بَحْث، رِسالَه في مَوضوع
pojednání
afhandling
fræîileg ritgerî
apcerējumstraktāts
rozprava
bilimsel incelemetez

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] Ntratado m

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntraité m (ouvrage)

treatise

nAbhandlung f (→ on über +acc)

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntrattato

treatise

(ˈtriːtiz) , ((American) -s) noun
a long, detailed, formal piece of writing on some subject. He wrote a treatise on methods of education.
References in classic literature ?
Wragge's anxiety was nothing more important than an old-fashioned Treatise on the Art of Cookery, reduced under the usual heads of Fish, Flesh, and Fowl, and containing the customary series of recipes.
What evenings, when the candles came, and I was expected to employ myself, but, not daring to read an entertaining book, pored over some hard-headed, harder-hearted treatise on arithmetic; when the tables of weights and measures set themselves to tunes, as 'Rule Britannia', or 'Away with Melancholy'; when they wouldn't stand still to be learnt, but would go threading my grandmother's needle through my unfortunate head, in at one ear and out at the other
Ye are friends and allies of our reverend father in God, Aymer, Prior of Jorvaulx,'' said the monk, without noticing the tone of De Bracy's reply; ``ye owe him aid both by knightly faith and holy charity; for what saith the blessed Saint Augustin, in his treatise De Civitate Dei ''
Any good treatise on political economy will do," said Trefusis.
Although I intend to leave the description of this empire to a particular treatise, yet, in the mean time, I am content to gratify the curious reader with some general ideas.
Here is a better recognition of popular rights, than volumes of those aphorisms which make the principal figure in several of our State bills of rights, and which would sound much better in a treatise of ethics than in a constitution of government.
So I devoted several months in privacy to the composition of a treatise on the mysteries of Three Dimensions.
Even when a treatise on medicine or natural science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet.
The following extract from an ancient treatise on the art of poetry called `Ming-Chung' sets forth most clearly certain ideals to be pursued:
At other times he would return home to write a treatise, and requested his friends not to disturb him.
The work I speak of is called `A Treatise on the Possibility of a General Monarchy in Italy,' and will make one large quarto volume.
But really--with only a medical treatise, you know--" and she glanced, with a pretty shrug of contempt, at the book over which I had fallen asleep.