treatise

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trea·tise

 (trē′tĭs)
n.
A systematic, usually extensive written discourse on a subject.

[Middle English treatis, from Anglo-Norman tretiz, alteration of treteiz, from Vulgar Latin *tractātīcius, from Latin tractātus, past participle of tractāre, to drag about, deal with; see treat.]

treatise

(ˈtriːtɪz)
n
1. a formal work on a subject, esp one that deals systematically with its principles and conclusions
2. an obsolete word for narrative
[C14: from Anglo-French tretiz, from Old French tretier to treat]

trea•tise

(ˈtri tɪs)

n.
a formal and systematic exposition in writing of the principles of a subject, generally longer and more detailed than an essay.
[1300–50; Middle English tretis < Anglo-French tretiz, akin to Old French traitier to treat]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.treatise - a formal expositiontreatise - a formal exposition      
piece of writing, written material, writing - the work of a writer; anything expressed in letters of the alphabet (especially when considered from the point of view of style and effect); "the writing in her novels is excellent"; "that editorial was a fine piece of writing"
dissertation, thesis - a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
pamphlet, tract - a brief treatise on a subject of interest; published in the form of a booklet
monograph - a detailed and documented treatise on a particular subject

treatise

noun paper, work, writing, study, essay, thesis, tract, pamphlet, exposition, dissertation, monograph, disquisition Locke's treatise on Civil Government

treatise

noun
A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
Translations
بَحْث، رِسالَه في مَوضوع
pojednání
afhandling
fræîileg ritgerî
apcerējumstraktāts
rozprava
bilimsel incelemetez

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] Ntratado m

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntraité m (ouvrage)

treatise

nAbhandlung f (→ on über +acc)

treatise

[ˈtriːtɪz] ntrattato

treatise

(ˈtriːtiz) , ((American) -s) noun
a long, detailed, formal piece of writing on some subject. He wrote a treatise on methods of education.
References in classic literature ?
Pocket was out lecturing; for, he was a most delightful lecturer on domestic economy, and his treatises on the management of children and servants were considered the very best text-books on those themes.
are distinguished in the old treatises on hunting, not by musical
Jones did not affect to consider Hiram Doolittle a perfect empiric in his profession, being in the constant habit of listening to his treatises on architecture with a kind of indulgent smile; yet, either from an inability to oppose them by anything plausible from his own stores of learning or from secret admiration, Richard generally submitted to the arguments of his co-adjutor.
I am the same philosopher who wrote each of the three hundred treatises commemorated by Diogenes Laertes.
I glanced at the books upon the table, and in spite of my ignorance of German I could see that two of them were treatises on science, the others being volumes of poetry.
You're late,' boomed the author of sociological treatises, as he appeared.
Long-winded treatises on the Buffy and Boodle question, showing how Buffy is immaculate and Boodle villainous, and how the country is lost by being all Boodle and no Buffy, or saved by being all Buffy and no Boodle (it must be one of the two, and cannot be anything else), are the staple of her reading.
He laughed at theoretical treatises on estate management, disliked factories, the raising of expensive products, and the buying of expensive seed corn, and did not make a hobby of any particular part of the work on his estate.
These little "solid treatises," as he called them, were sold at the University library under the name of "Historical and Geographic Catechisms.
It is well worth while carefully to study the several treatises published on some of our old cultivated plants, as on the hyacinth, potato, even the dahlia, &c.
Burke's 'Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of our Ideas on the Sublime and Beautiful,' published the same year, and next in time after Dryden among important English treatises on esthetics, has lost all authority with the coming of the modern science of psychology, but it is at least sincere and interesting.
To these encroachments, time and ignorance, the two great supporters of imposture, gave authority; and thus many rules for good writing have been established, which have not the least foundation in truth or nature; and which commonly serve for no other purpose than to curb and restrain genius, in the same manner as it would have restrained the dancing-master, had the many excellent treatises on that art laid it down as an essential rule that every man must dance in chains.