tree of heaven


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tree of heaven

n.
A deciduous, rapidly growing tree (Ailanthus altissima) native to China, having compound leaves and strong-smelling flowers, and widely planted as a street tree.

tree of heaven

n
(Plants) another name for ailanthus

ai•lan•thus

(eɪˈlæn θəs)

n., pl. -thus•es.
any of several wide-spreading trees of the genus Ailanthus, of the quassia family, with long leaves and dense flower clusters, esp. A. altissima (tree of heaven), an urban shade tree.
[1788; < New Latin Ailantus, Ailanthus < Central Moluccan ai lanit(o), ai lanit(e)=ai tree, wood + lanit sky]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tree of heaven - deciduous rapidly growing tree of China with foliage like sumac and sweetish fetid flowerstree of heaven - deciduous rapidly growing tree of China with foliage like sumac and sweetish fetid flowers; widely planted in United States as a street tree because of its resistance to pollution
genus Ailanthus - small genus of east Asian and Chinese trees with odd-pinnate leaves and long twisted samaras
ailanthus - any of several deciduous Asian trees of the genus Ailanthus
Translations

tree of heaven

nalbero del paradiso
References in periodicals archive ?
Among those lost was a 120-yearold Chinese Tree of Heaven which fell onto King William IV's Temple at Kew Gardens.
Dr Brinsley Burbidge, a senior staff member at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, west London, climbing over the 120-year-old Chinese Tree of Heaven, a casualty of the storm
Dr Brinsley Burbidge, a senior staffmember at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, west London, climbing over the 120-year-old Chinese Tree of Heaven, a casualty of the storm
Dr Brinsley Burbidge, a senior staff member at the Royal Botanic Gardens, at Kew, west London, climbing over the 120-year-old Chinese Tree of Heaven, a casualty of the storm
Miroslav Srnka: Here With You, Tree of Heaven (Czech premieres).
It is said that in the middle of the second holiest Muslim month, Shaaban, the leaves of the tree of heaven start falling.
5% of nests in white mulberry (Morus alba) and tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), both nonnative species (Table 1).
To prevent the spread of the tree of heaven, the disease is repeated several times depending on the work as follows:
We had stands of poison ivy including vines around the Black Walnut as thick as a human thigh, thickets of the invasive Nadina, a 40 by 50 foot stand of tassel top cane, Arundo donax, (another Asian transplant) with accompanying rhizome mat, a Mimosa tree, a Tree of Heaven, a Chinaberry.