tree ring


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Related to tree ring: Growth rings

tree ring

n
(Botany) another name for annual ring

an′nual ring′


n.
a yearly formation of new wood in woody plants, observable as a ring on the cross section of a tree trunk.
Also called tree ring.
[1875–80]

tree ring

- Any of the concentric rings of the cross-section of a tree trunk, representing a year's growth, or the layer of wood produced by a year's growth in a woody plant; also called annual ring.
See also related terms for tree trunk.
Translations
letokruh
capa anual
References in periodicals archive ?
The tree ring data create a comprehensive history of drought conditions in the Southwest and Central Plains from about 1,000 years ago to 2005 and show a severely dry period in the 1100s, which may have contributed to the decline of ancient Pueblo peoples of the Colorado Plateau in the late 13th century.
Each tree ring was exactly dated by using standard dendrochronologic methods described by Douglass (17), and earlywood and latewood growth increments were measured by using a stage micrometer.
The society's Joy Parry, who is retired and lives in Cardiff, said: "He's an authority on tree ring dating and he's done a lot of diving in various places so we're all looking forward to hearing his lecture.
See Rocky Mountain Tree Ring Research reference for detailed information on use and care of increment borers.
There is now an archive of tree ring samples dating back to more than 12,000 years ago.
It has evolved from a tree ring dating project which established probable building dates for more than 90 properties in the region.
We map their crown structure, we collect leaf and branch samples and tree ring cores, we install weather stations .
Figure 2 shows three Northern Hemisphere summer temperature reconstructions based entirely on tree ring data, using different standardization techniques.
Experts at Stockholm University studied data from tree ring sediments to investigate temperature changes over the last 2000 years.
Scientists combined tree ring data and sediment records to investigate long-term changes in northern hemisphere temperature.
Covering subjects like tools and techniques, tree ring dating, identifying Stone, Bronze and Iron Age objects and using a map to find archaeological sites, it also looks at the origins of place names.