tremble


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Related to tremble: Trimble

trem·ble

 (trĕm′bəl)
intr.v. trem·bled, trem·bling, trem·bles
1. To shake involuntarily, as from excitement or anger; quake. See Synonyms at shake.
2. To feel fear or anxiety: I tremble at the very thought of it.
3. To vibrate or quiver: leaves trembling in the breeze.
n.
1. The act or state of trembling.
2. trembles A convulsive fit of shaking. Used with the.
3. trembles (used with a sing. verb)
a. Poisoning of domestic animals, especially cattle and sheep, caused by eating white snakeroot or the composite plant Isocoma pluriflora of the southwest United States and northern Mexico, and characterized by muscular tremors and weakening. Also called milk sickness.
b. Any of several other animal diseases characterized by trembling, such as louping ill.

[Middle English tremblen, from Old French trembler, from Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, from Latin tremulus, trembling; see tremulous.]

trem′bler n.
trem′bling·ly adv.
trem′bly adj.

tremble

(ˈtrɛmbəl)
vb (intr)
1. to vibrate with short slight movements; quiver
2. to shake involuntarily, as with cold or fear; shiver
3. to experience fear or anxiety
n
the act or an instance of trembling
[C14: from Old French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulāre, from Latin tremulus quivering, from tremere to quake]
ˈtrembling adj
ˈtremblingly adv
ˈtrembly adj

trem•ble

(ˈtrɛm bəl)

v. -bled, -bling,
n. v.i.
1. to shake involuntarily with quick, short movements, as from fear, excitement, or cold; quake; quiver.
2. to be troubled with fear or apprehension.
3. to be tremulous.
n.
4. the act of trembling.
5. trembles, (used with a sing. v.) milk sickness.
[1275–1325; Middle English trem(b)len (v.) < Old French trembler < Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, derivative of Latin tremulus tremulous]
trem′bler, n.

tremble

  • quaver - Came from the now obsolete Middle English quave, "tremble."
  • didder, dither - To didder or dither is to tremble or shake.
  • tremble - From the Proto Indo-European base trem-, "shake."
  • tremendous - Based on Latin tremere, "to tremble."

tremble


Past participle: trembled
Gerund: trembling

Imperative
tremble
tremble
Present
I tremble
you tremble
he/she/it trembles
we tremble
you tremble
they tremble
Preterite
I trembled
you trembled
he/she/it trembled
we trembled
you trembled
they trembled
Present Continuous
I am trembling
you are trembling
he/she/it is trembling
we are trembling
you are trembling
they are trembling
Present Perfect
I have trembled
you have trembled
he/she/it has trembled
we have trembled
you have trembled
they have trembled
Past Continuous
I was trembling
you were trembling
he/she/it was trembling
we were trembling
you were trembling
they were trembling
Past Perfect
I had trembled
you had trembled
he/she/it had trembled
we had trembled
you had trembled
they had trembled
Future
I will tremble
you will tremble
he/she/it will tremble
we will tremble
you will tremble
they will tremble
Future Perfect
I will have trembled
you will have trembled
he/she/it will have trembled
we will have trembled
you will have trembled
they will have trembled
Future Continuous
I will be trembling
you will be trembling
he/she/it will be trembling
we will be trembling
you will be trembling
they will be trembling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been trembling
you have been trembling
he/she/it has been trembling
we have been trembling
you have been trembling
they have been trembling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been trembling
you will have been trembling
he/she/it will have been trembling
we will have been trembling
you will have been trembling
they will have been trembling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been trembling
you had been trembling
he/she/it had been trembling
we had been trembling
you had been trembling
they had been trembling
Conditional
I would tremble
you would tremble
he/she/it would tremble
we would tremble
you would tremble
they would tremble
Past Conditional
I would have trembled
you would have trembled
he/she/it would have trembled
we would have trembled
you would have trembled
they would have trembled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tremble - a reflex motion caused by cold or fear or excitementtremble - a reflex motion caused by cold or fear or excitement
Verb1.tremble - move or jerk quickly and involuntarily up and down or sidewaystremble - move or jerk quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways; "His hands were trembling when he signed the document"
shiver, shudder, thrill, throb - tremble convulsively, as from fear or excitement
quake, quiver, palpitate - shake with fast, tremulous movements; "His nostrils palpitated"
shake, agitate - move or cause to move back and forth; "The chemist shook the flask vigorously"; "My hands were shaking"

tremble

verb
1. shake, shiver, quake, shudder, quiver, teeter, totter, quake in your boots, shake in your boots or shoes He began to tremble all over.
2. vibrate, rock, shake, quake, wobble, oscillate He felt the earth tremble under him.
noun
1. shake, shiver, quake, shudder, wobble, tremor, quiver, vibration, oscillation I'll never forget the tremble in his hand.

tremble

verb
1. To move to and fro in short, jerky movements:
2. To move to and fro violently:
noun
A state of nervous restlessness or agitation.Often used in plural:
fidget (often used in plural), jitter (used in plural), jump (used in plural), shiver (used in plural).
Informal: all-overs, shake (used in plural).
Translations
إرْتِجاف، إرْتِعاشيَرْتَجِف، يَرْتَعِشيَرْتَعِدُ
chvěníchvět setřást setřes
rysteskælveskælven
vapista
drhtati
remegés
skjálfaskjálfti, titringur
震える
떨다
drebēttrīcēttrīsas
tresti se
darra
สั่นสะเทือน
titremektitreme
run

tremble

[ˈtrembl]
A. Ntemblor m
to be all of a trembleestar tembloroso
she said with a tremble in her voicedijo con voz temblorosa
B. VI to tremble (with)temblar (de)
to tremble with feartemblar de miedo
to tremble at the thought of sthtemblar ante la idea de algo
to tremble all overestar todo tembloroso
to tremble like a leafestar como un flan

tremble

[ˈtrɛmbəl] vi
[person, hand] → trembler
I was trembling with fear → Je tremblais de peur.
[voice] → trembler
[earth, trees] → trembler

tremble

vi (person, hand etc)zittern (with vor); (voice also)beben (with vor); (ground, building)beben, zittern; I tremble to think what might have happenedmir wird angst or ich zittere, wenn ich daran denke, was hätte geschehen können; to tremble for somebody/somethingum jdn/etw zittern or bangen
nZittern nt, → Beben nt; to be all of a tremble (inf)am ganzen Körper zittern, das große Zittern haben (inf)

tremble

[ˈtrɛmbl]
1. n (of fear) → tremito; (of passion, excitement) → fremito
to be all of a tremble (fam) → tremare dalla testa ai piedi, tremare come una foglia
2. vitremare; (machine) → vibrare
to tremble with → tremare per
to tremble at the thought of sth → tremare al pensiero di qc

tremble

(ˈtrembl) verb
to shake eg with cold, fear, weakness etc. She trembled with cold; His hands trembled as he lit a cigarette.
noun
a shudder; a tremor. a tremble of fear; The walls gave a sudden tremble as the lorry passed by.

tremble

يَرْتَعِدُ třást se skælve zittern τρέμω temblar vapista trembler drhtati tremare 震える 떨다 trillen skjelve zadrżeć tremer дрожать darra สั่นสะเทือน titremek run 颤抖

tremble

n. temblor, estremecimiento, movimiento involuntario oscilatorio;
v. temblar; estremecerse.

tremble

vi temblar
References in classic literature ?
I'm so fond of writing, I should go spinning on forever if motives of economy didn't stop me, for though I've used thin paper and written fine, I tremble to think of the stamps this long letter will need.
Every eye was simultaneously bent on his person, as if to inquire into the truth or falsehood of the declaration, with an intelligence and keenness that caused the subject of their scrutiny to tremble for the result.
She could not but tremble at these preparations; for she felt that -- having now done all that humanity, or principle, or, if so it were, a refined cruelty, impelled him to do for the relief of physical suffering -- he was next to treat with her as the man whom she had most deeply and irreparably injured.
Though they were not angels, they "passed," as the French say, causing me, while they stayed, to tremble with the fear of their addressing to their younger victims some yet more infernal message or more vivid image than they had thought good enough for myself.
I did not know what it was, but there was something in the sound so strange that it made me tremble all over.
and the brow of the young man grew dark, and his eyes burned with an expression that made his young wife tremble.
It warn't funny to me, though; I was all of a tremble to see his danger.
She began to tremble with emotion, and straightway sent to beg him to let his "po' ole nigger Mammy have jes one sight of him en die for joy.
I want to play out of doors," Mary answered, hoping that her voice did not tremble.
Norah, who held her sister's hand in her own, felt it tremble for a moment, and then turn cold -- and that was all.
My heart started to tremble within me, though I could not say why.
But, your honor, the sheep may well tremble without the shepherd.