trench


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Related to trench: Mariana Trench

trench

 (trĕnch)
n.
1. A deep furrow or ditch.
2. A long narrow ditch embanked with its own soil and used for concealment and protection in warfare.
3. A long, steep-sided valley on the ocean floor.
v. trenched, trench·ing, trench·es
v.tr.
1. To dig or make a trench or trenches in (land or an area, for example).
2. To place in a trench: trench a pipeline.
v.intr.
1. To dig a trench or trenches.
2. To encroach. Often used with on or upon: "The bishop exceeded his powers, and trenched on those of the king" (Francis Parkman).
3. To verge or border. Often used with on or upon: "a broad playfulness that trenched on buffoonery" (George Meredith).

[Middle English trenche, from Old French, a cutting, slice, from trenchier, to cut, from Vulgar Latin *trincāre, perhaps partly from Latin *trīncāre, to cut in three (from earlier *trīnicāre : Latin rīnī, three each, triple; see trei- in Indo-European roots + Latin -icāre, as in duplicāre, to double, split in two; see duplicate) and partly from a Gaulish root *trink-, to cut, behead, found in Late Latin trincus trincus, a kind of gladiator who was subject to particular Gaulish customs and probably fought until beheaded (of Gaulish origin, perhaps ultimately from a pre-Roman substrate root *trenk-, to cut, or perhaps akin to Latin truncus, trunk; see terə in Indo-European roots).]

trench

(trɛntʃ)
n
1. a deep ditch or furrow
2. (Fortifications) a ditch dug as a fortification, having a parapet of the excavated earth
vb
3. to make a trench in (a place)
4. (Fortifications) (tr) to fortify with a trench or trenches
5. to slash or be slashed
6. (intr; foll by on or upon) to encroach or verge
[C14: from Old French trenche something cut, from trenchier to cut, from Latin truncāre to cut off]

trench

(trɛntʃ)

n.
1. a long, narrow excavation in the ground dug by soldiers as a defense against enemy fire or attack.
2. a deep furrow, ditch, or cut.
3. a long, narrow depression in the deep-sea floor, site of ocean deeps.
v.t.
4. to surround or fortify with trenches; entrench.
5. to cut a trench in.
6. to set or place in a trench.
7. to form (a furrow, ditch, etc.) by cutting into or through something.
8. to make a cut in.
v.i.
9. to dig a trench.
[1350–1400; Middle English trenche path made by cutting < Old French: act of cutting, a cut, derivative of trenchier to cut < Vulgar Latin *trincāre, for Latin truncāre to lop]

trench


Past participle: trenched
Gerund: trenching

Imperative
trench
trench
Present
I trench
you trench
he/she/it trenches
we trench
you trench
they trench
Preterite
I trenched
you trenched
he/she/it trenched
we trenched
you trenched
they trenched
Present Continuous
I am trenching
you are trenching
he/she/it is trenching
we are trenching
you are trenching
they are trenching
Present Perfect
I have trenched
you have trenched
he/she/it has trenched
we have trenched
you have trenched
they have trenched
Past Continuous
I was trenching
you were trenching
he/she/it was trenching
we were trenching
you were trenching
they were trenching
Past Perfect
I had trenched
you had trenched
he/she/it had trenched
we had trenched
you had trenched
they had trenched
Future
I will trench
you will trench
he/she/it will trench
we will trench
you will trench
they will trench
Future Perfect
I will have trenched
you will have trenched
he/she/it will have trenched
we will have trenched
you will have trenched
they will have trenched
Future Continuous
I will be trenching
you will be trenching
he/she/it will be trenching
we will be trenching
you will be trenching
they will be trenching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been trenching
you have been trenching
he/she/it has been trenching
we have been trenching
you have been trenching
they have been trenching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been trenching
you will have been trenching
he/she/it will have been trenching
we will have been trenching
you will have been trenching
they will have been trenching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been trenching
you had been trenching
he/she/it had been trenching
we had been trenching
you had been trenching
they had been trenching
Conditional
I would trench
you would trench
he/she/it would trench
we would trench
you would trench
they would trench
Past Conditional
I would have trenched
you would have trenched
he/she/it would have trenched
we would have trenched
you would have trenched
they would have trenched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trench - a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earthtrench - a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earth
approach trench, communication trench - a trench that provides protected passage between the rear and front lines of a defensive position
ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth
entrenchment, intrenchment - an entrenched fortification; a position protected by trenches
fire trench - a trench especially constructed for the delivery of small-arms fire
fosse, moat - ditch dug as a fortification and usually filled with water
slit trench - narrow trench for shelter in battle
2.trench - a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floortrench - a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floor
natural depression, depression - a sunken or depressed geological formation
3.trench - any long ditch cut in the groundtrench - any long ditch cut in the ground  
ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth
furrow - a long shallow trench in the ground (especially one made by a plow)
Verb1.trench - impinge or infringe upon; "This impinges on my rights as an individual"; "This matter entrenches on other domains"
take advantage, trespass - make excessive use of; "You are taking advantage of my good will!"; "She is trespassing upon my privacy"
2.trench - fortify by surrounding with trenchestrench - fortify by surrounding with trenches; "He trenched his military camp"
fort, fortify - enclose by or as if by a fortification
3.trench - cut or carve deeply intotrench - cut or carve deeply into; "letters trenched into the stone"
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
4.trench - set, plant, or bury in a trench; "trench the fallen soldiers"; "trench the vegetables"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
5.trench - cut a trench in, as for drainagetrench - cut a trench in, as for drainage; "ditch the land to drain it"; "trench the fields"
hollow, excavate, dig - remove the inner part or the core of; "the mining company wants to excavate the hillside"
6.trench - dig a trench or trenchestrench - dig a trench or trenches; "The National Guardsmen were sent out to trench"
dig, dig out - create by digging; "dig a hole"; "dig out a channel"

trench

noun ditch, cut, channel, drain, pit, waterway, gutter, trough, furrow, excavation, earthwork, fosse, entrenchment Dig a trench at least 2ft deep.
Translations
příkopzákop
grøftrendeskyttegrav
kaivanto
rov
lövészárok
skotgröf
深くて細長い溝
참호
apkasastranšėja
ierakumitranšeja
zákop
jarek
dike
คู
rãnh

trench

[trentʃ]
A. N (gen) → zanja f (Mil) → trinchera f
B. VT (gen) → hacer zanjas en (Mil) → hacer trincheras en, atrincherar (Agr) → excavar
C. CPD trench coat Ntrinchera f
trench warfare Nguerra f de trincheras

trench

[ˈtrɛntʃ] n
(for pipes, water drainage)tranchée f
(MILITARY)tranchée f

trench

nGraben m; (Mil) → Schützengraben m; in the trenches (Mil) → im Schützengraben
vtGräben plziehen in (+dat); (Mil) → Schützengräben plausheben in (+dat)

trench

:
trench mortar
n (Mil) → Granatwerfer m
trench warfare

trench

[trɛntʃ] n (gen) → fosso (Mil) → trincea

trench

(trentʃ) noun
a long narrow ditch dug in the ground, especially as a protection for soldiers against gunfire. The soldiers returned to the trenches.

trench

خَنْدَق příkop grøft Graben τάφρος zanja kaivanto tranchée rov trincea 深くて細長い溝 참호 geul grøft rów trincheira ров dike คู siper rãnh 壕沟

trench

n. trinchera, zanja, foso;
___ backrigidez y dolor de espalda;
___ feverfiebre de ___, fiebre remitente transmitida por piojos;
___ footpie de ___, infección en los pies por exposición al frío;
___ -mouthinfección con ulceración de las mucosas de la boca y la faringe.
References in classic literature ?
They began at the water- mark and proceeded in the bank some distance, which we understood by their making the water muddy with the clay; and we immediately proceeded to disappoint their design, by cutting a trench across their subterranean passage.
A stream of PUCKITTYPUKK had furrowed a course for itself in the ice at its base, and we were obliged to stand with one FUSS on each side of this, and endeavor to keep ourselves CHAUD by cutting steps in the steep bank of the pedestal, so as to get a higher place for standing on, as the WASSER rose rapidly in its trench.
As when bands Of Pioners with Spade and Pickaxe arm'd Forerun the Royal Camp, to trench a Field, Or cast a Rampart.
A double stockade, or palisade, composed of pointed beams, which the adjacent forest supplied, defended the outer and inner bank of the trench.
Then we went back to the forest together and dug a mighty trench in which we buried the elephant I had killed, in order that when it became a skeleton my master might return and secure its tusks.
It was thus rather the exacting nature of my aspirations than any particular degradation in my faults, that made me what I was, and, with even a deeper trench than in the majority of men, severed in me those provinces of good and ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.
Between these two the roadway runs in a trench, sparsely lighted at night, sparsely frequented by day, and bordered, when it was cleared the place of tombs, by dingy and ambiguous houses.
Instead of digging round the Nautilus which would have involved greater difficulty, Captain Nemo had an immense trench made at eight yards from the port-quarter.
In fact, four men such as they were--four men devoted to one another, from their purses to their lives; four men always supporting one another, never yielding, executing singly or together the resolutions formed in common; four arms threatening the four cardinal points, or turning toward a single point--must inevitably, either subterraneously, in open day, by mining, in the trench, by cunning, or by force, open themselves a way toward the object they wished to attain, however well it might be defended, or however distant it may seem.
When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench a cubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as a drink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, then wine, and in the third place water--sprinkling white barley meal over the whole.
Here they began to fortify themselves; the women digging a trench, and throwing up a breastwork of logs and branches, deep hid in the bosom of the wood, while the warriors skirmished at the edge to keep the trappers at bay.
Looking at him still more fixedly than I had yet done, I saw written in his eye and mien a resolution to arrogate to himself a freedom so unlimited that it might often trench on the just liberty of his neighbours.