trench fever


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Related to trench fever: relapsing fever

trench fever

n.
An acute infectious disease characterized by chills and fever, caused by the bacterium Bartonella quintana and transmitted by body lice.

[From its occurrence among soldiers in trenches.]

trench fever

n
(Pathology) an acute infectious disease characterized by fever and muscular aches and pains, caused by the microorganism Rickettsia quintana and transmitted by the bite of a body louse

trench′ fe`ver


n.
a recurrent fever and pain in the muscles and joints caused by a rickettsia transmitted by the body louse.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trench fever - marked by pain in muscles and joints and transmitted by licetrench fever - marked by pain in muscles and joints and transmitted by lice
rickettsial disease, rickettsiosis - infectious disease caused by ticks or mites or body lice infected with rickettsial bacteria
References in periodicals archive ?
There was also news that soldiers from the village, Peter and James Morrison, were in hospital suffering from trench fever.
Bertie contracted trench fever and Leonard suffered from gas poisoning.
The 31-year-old had been invalided home earlier in the war with trench fever but had gone back to fight.
Our observation that the strongest determinant of body lice in the homeless was alcoholism correlates with previous observations that trench fever is associated with a history of alcoholism (10-13).
Tolkien specialist John Garth, author of Tolkien and the Great War, said: "When he came back from the trenches, with trench fever, he spent the winter [of 1916-17] convalescing.
Following his return from the trenches of the Somme in the First World War and convalescing from trench fever in the winter of 1916-1917, JRR Tolkien was inspired to write Beren and Luthien when his wife Edith danced in a glade filled with white flowers.
The English author wrote "Beren and LE[bar]thien" after he returned from his World War I service, during his convalescence from trench fever.
Trench fever (Bartonella quintana Schmincke infection) is transmitted by the human body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus Linnaeus), and manifests clinically as nonspecific febrile illness, bacillary angiomatosis, or endocarditis.
Corbett draws on division, brigade, and battalion war diaries to provide background on the regiment and the 31st Division in France and Belgium, incorporating entries Smallshaw wrote about his experiences from September 1914 to March 1919, including the attack at the village of Serre, the battle at Oppy Wood, his bout of trench fever, and fighting against the Germans in their spring offensive in 1918.
Tolkien's life - and that of his great works - was probably saved when he succumbed to trench fever, a disease carried by lice, and he was invalided back to England in November 1916.